Pool Spacing in Forest Channels

Pool Spacing in Forest Channels Field surveys of stream channels in forested mountain drainage basins in southeast Alaska and Washington reveal that pool spacing depends on large woody debris (LWD) loading and channel type, slope, and width. Mean pool spacing in pool‐riffle, plane‐bed, and forced pool‐riffle channels systematically decreases from greater than 13 channel widths per pool to less than 1 channel width with increasing LWD loading, whereas pool spacing in generally steeper, step‐pool channels is independent of LWD loading. Although plane‐bed and pool‐riffle channels occur at similar low LWD loading, they exhibit typical pool spacings of greater than 9 and 2–4 channel widths, respectively. Forced pool‐riffle channels have high LWD loading, typical pool spacing of <2 channel widths, and slopes that overlap the ranges of free‐formed pool‐riffle and plane‐bed channel types. While a forced pool‐riffle morphology may mask either of these low‐LWD‐loading morphologies, channel slope provides an indicator of probable morphologic response to wood loss in forced pool‐riffle reaches. At all study sites, less than 40% of the LWD pieces force the formation of a pool. We also find that channel width strongly influences pool spacing in forest streams with similar debris loading and that reaches flowing through previously clear‐cut forests have lower LWD loading and hence fewer pools than reaches in pristine forests. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/pool-spacing-in-forest-channels-qMHQkqUZpN
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
DOI
10.1029/94WR03285
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Field surveys of stream channels in forested mountain drainage basins in southeast Alaska and Washington reveal that pool spacing depends on large woody debris (LWD) loading and channel type, slope, and width. Mean pool spacing in pool‐riffle, plane‐bed, and forced pool‐riffle channels systematically decreases from greater than 13 channel widths per pool to less than 1 channel width with increasing LWD loading, whereas pool spacing in generally steeper, step‐pool channels is independent of LWD loading. Although plane‐bed and pool‐riffle channels occur at similar low LWD loading, they exhibit typical pool spacings of greater than 9 and 2–4 channel widths, respectively. Forced pool‐riffle channels have high LWD loading, typical pool spacing of <2 channel widths, and slopes that overlap the ranges of free‐formed pool‐riffle and plane‐bed channel types. While a forced pool‐riffle morphology may mask either of these low‐LWD‐loading morphologies, channel slope provides an indicator of probable morphologic response to wood loss in forced pool‐riffle reaches. At all study sites, less than 40% of the LWD pieces force the formation of a pool. We also find that channel width strongly influences pool spacing in forest streams with similar debris loading and that reaches flowing through previously clear‐cut forests have lower LWD loading and hence fewer pools than reaches in pristine forests.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1995

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off