Polyethylene glycol‐based bowel preparation before colonoscopy for selected inpatients: A pilot study

Polyethylene glycol‐based bowel preparation before colonoscopy for selected inpatients: A pilot... INTRODUCTIONColonoscopy represents the gold standard procedure for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer, which is the third most common cancer worldwide. It is also the standard practice for lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or anemia. The absence of solids or residual brown liquid during an endoscopy, which could mask a potential lesion, ensures adequate visualization of the colonic mucosae. Suitable intestinal cleaning is critical for the effectiveness and security of the procedure. However, unfortunately, inadequate bowel cleansing has been reported to be found in approximately 20% of the participants who undergo endoscopy, and is associated with a decreased detection rate of polyps and adenomas during the colonoscopy.The quality of colonic mucosal visualization is usually classified by the quantity of solid or liquid stool in the lumen. A colonoscopy can be described as a valid examination when it allows the visualization of the lesions of ≤5 mm in size. There are many regimens of preparing the patient for colonoscopy, including polyethylene glycol (PEG), sodium phosphate, sodium picosulfate and oral sulfate solutions. Standard regimens of bowel preparation involve the unpleasant task of ingesting a high‐volume cleansing compound at the evening before the procedure. A valid policy to improve the tolerability and patient compliance http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Digestive Diseases Wiley

Polyethylene glycol‐based bowel preparation before colonoscopy for selected inpatients: A pilot study

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
ISSN
1751-2972
eISSN
1751-2980
D.O.I.
10.1111/1751-2980.12571
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONColonoscopy represents the gold standard procedure for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer, which is the third most common cancer worldwide. It is also the standard practice for lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or anemia. The absence of solids or residual brown liquid during an endoscopy, which could mask a potential lesion, ensures adequate visualization of the colonic mucosae. Suitable intestinal cleaning is critical for the effectiveness and security of the procedure. However, unfortunately, inadequate bowel cleansing has been reported to be found in approximately 20% of the participants who undergo endoscopy, and is associated with a decreased detection rate of polyps and adenomas during the colonoscopy.The quality of colonic mucosal visualization is usually classified by the quantity of solid or liquid stool in the lumen. A colonoscopy can be described as a valid examination when it allows the visualization of the lesions of ≤5 mm in size. There are many regimens of preparing the patient for colonoscopy, including polyethylene glycol (PEG), sodium phosphate, sodium picosulfate and oral sulfate solutions. Standard regimens of bowel preparation involve the unpleasant task of ingesting a high‐volume cleansing compound at the evening before the procedure. A valid policy to improve the tolerability and patient compliance

Journal

Journal of Digestive DiseasesWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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