Plasma levels of interleukin‐6 and C‐reactive protein are associated with physical inactivity independent of obesity

Plasma levels of interleukin‐6 and C‐reactive protein are associated with physical inactivity... It is recognized that the path from physical inactivity and obesity to lifestyle‐related diseases involves low‐grade inflammation, indicated by elevated plasma levels of inflammatory markers. Interestingly, contracting skeletal muscle is a major source of circulating interleukin‐6 (IL‐6) in response to acute exercise, but with a markedly lower response in trained subjects. As C‐reactive protein (CRP) is induced by IL‐6, we hypothesized that basal levels of IL‐6 and CRP reflect the degree of regular physical activity when compared with other markers of inflammation associated with lifestyle‐related morbidity. Fasting plasma/serum levels of IL‐6, IL‐18, CRP, tumur necrosis factor‐α (TNF‐α), soluble TNF receptor II (sTNF‐RII), and adiponectin were measured in healthy non‐diabetic men and women (n=84). The amount of leisure‐time physical activity (LTPA) was assessed by interview. Obesity was associated with elevated insulin, C‐peptide, triglycerides, low‐density lipoprotein, IL‐6, CRP, and adiponectin (all P<0.05). Importantly, physical inactivity was associated with elevated C‐peptide (P=0.036), IL‐6 (P=0.014), and CRP (P=0.007) independent of obesity, age, gender, and smoking. Furthermore, the LTPA score was inversely associated with IL‐6 (P=0.017) and CRP (P=0.005), but with neither of the other markers. The results indicate that low levels of IL‐6 and CRP – not IL‐18, TNF‐α, sTNF‐RII, or adiponectin – reflect regular physical activity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports Wiley

Plasma levels of interleukin‐6 and C‐reactive protein are associated with physical inactivity independent of obesity

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/plasma-levels-of-interleukin-6-and-c-reactive-protein-are-associated-jYfAr0Q3b9
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0905-7188
eISSN
1600-0838
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1600-0838.2006.00602.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is recognized that the path from physical inactivity and obesity to lifestyle‐related diseases involves low‐grade inflammation, indicated by elevated plasma levels of inflammatory markers. Interestingly, contracting skeletal muscle is a major source of circulating interleukin‐6 (IL‐6) in response to acute exercise, but with a markedly lower response in trained subjects. As C‐reactive protein (CRP) is induced by IL‐6, we hypothesized that basal levels of IL‐6 and CRP reflect the degree of regular physical activity when compared with other markers of inflammation associated with lifestyle‐related morbidity. Fasting plasma/serum levels of IL‐6, IL‐18, CRP, tumur necrosis factor‐α (TNF‐α), soluble TNF receptor II (sTNF‐RII), and adiponectin were measured in healthy non‐diabetic men and women (n=84). The amount of leisure‐time physical activity (LTPA) was assessed by interview. Obesity was associated with elevated insulin, C‐peptide, triglycerides, low‐density lipoprotein, IL‐6, CRP, and adiponectin (all P<0.05). Importantly, physical inactivity was associated with elevated C‐peptide (P=0.036), IL‐6 (P=0.014), and CRP (P=0.007) independent of obesity, age, gender, and smoking. Furthermore, the LTPA score was inversely associated with IL‐6 (P=0.017) and CRP (P=0.005), but with neither of the other markers. The results indicate that low levels of IL‐6 and CRP – not IL‐18, TNF‐α, sTNF‐RII, or adiponectin – reflect regular physical activity.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in SportsWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2007

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off