Plasma ammonia concentration after L‐asparaginase therapy in 27 dogs with high‐grade lymphoma or leukemia

Plasma ammonia concentration after L‐asparaginase therapy in 27 dogs with high‐grade lymphoma... AbbreviationsAEadverse eventALTalanine transaminaseALPalkaline phosphatasecPLIcanine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivityGIgastrointestinalL‐aspL‐asparaginaseIntroductionL‐asparaginase (L‐asp) is an enzyme commonly used in both human and veterinary medicine as part of multiagent chemotherapy protocols for lymphoproliferative malignancies. L‐asp works by depleting the peripheral blood of asparagine, a necessary amino acid for survival of lymphoid cells. While normal lymphoid cells are able to produce their own asparagine, neoplastic lymphoid cells cannot, leaving them reliant upon extracellular asparagine reserves. Adverse reactions to L‐asp are not common in dogs; however, previously reported reactions include anaphylaxis, pancreatitis, decreased protein synthesis, coagulopathies, hepatotoxicity, and more recently, hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare complication of intensive chemotherapy in people characterized by increased serum ammonia concentration, normal liver function tests, and respiratory alkalosis. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy has been documented in people treated with several chemotherapy agents including cytarabine, vincristine, etoposide, L‐asp, cyclophosphamide, 5‐fluorouracil, and sunitinib. L‐asp has been reported to cause hyperammonemia in people with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoma. Two mechanisms of action have been described. First, asparagine is deaminated by asparaginase, which leads to the breakdown products of ammonia and aspartic acid, and thus accumulation of ammonia in the plasma. Glutamine metabolism is also diverted to asparagine synthesis, which is immediately deaminated by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Wiley

Plasma ammonia concentration after L‐asparaginase therapy in 27 dogs with high‐grade lymphoma or leukemia

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/plasma-ammonia-concentration-after-l-asparaginase-therapy-in-27-dogs-n6zSRH2xIu
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society
ISSN
1479-3261
eISSN
1476-4431
D.O.I.
10.1111/vec.12695
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsAEadverse eventALTalanine transaminaseALPalkaline phosphatasecPLIcanine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivityGIgastrointestinalL‐aspL‐asparaginaseIntroductionL‐asparaginase (L‐asp) is an enzyme commonly used in both human and veterinary medicine as part of multiagent chemotherapy protocols for lymphoproliferative malignancies. L‐asp works by depleting the peripheral blood of asparagine, a necessary amino acid for survival of lymphoid cells. While normal lymphoid cells are able to produce their own asparagine, neoplastic lymphoid cells cannot, leaving them reliant upon extracellular asparagine reserves. Adverse reactions to L‐asp are not common in dogs; however, previously reported reactions include anaphylaxis, pancreatitis, decreased protein synthesis, coagulopathies, hepatotoxicity, and more recently, hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare complication of intensive chemotherapy in people characterized by increased serum ammonia concentration, normal liver function tests, and respiratory alkalosis. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy has been documented in people treated with several chemotherapy agents including cytarabine, vincristine, etoposide, L‐asp, cyclophosphamide, 5‐fluorouracil, and sunitinib. L‐asp has been reported to cause hyperammonemia in people with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoma. Two mechanisms of action have been described. First, asparagine is deaminated by asparaginase, which leads to the breakdown products of ammonia and aspartic acid, and thus accumulation of ammonia in the plasma. Glutamine metabolism is also diverted to asparagine synthesis, which is immediately deaminated by

Journal

Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical CareWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off