Plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) concentrations and clinical response in horses treated for equine Cushing's disease with cyproheptadine or pergolide

Plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) concentrations and clinical response in horses treated for... Summary Plasma ACTH levels have been variable in horses with a positive clinical response for therapy for equine Cushing's Disease (ECD). Therefore, our purpose was to determine the value of monitoring plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) levels during treatment of equine Cushing's disease (ECD) with either cyproheptadine (n = 32) or pergolide (n = 10). First, we validated the chemiluminescent ACTH assay (specificity, precision, accuracy, intra‐assay and interassay variations) and tested methods of handling the whole blood from the time of collection to when the ACTH was assayed. The sensitivity and specificity of high plasma ACTH levels for detecting ECD was determined in a retrospective study on hospitalised horses (n = 68). Surveys were sent to veterinarians who submitted equine ACTH levels that were high initially and had at least 2 ACTH samples to determine the value of monitoring ACTH levels during therapy of ECD. The ACTH chemiluminescent assay was valid. The ACTH was stable when whole blood was collected and held in plastic tubes for 8h before separating the plasma. The sensitivity and specificity of plasma ACTH levels for detecting ECD were 84% (n = 19, 95% CI 60, 97) and 78% (n = 49, 95% CI 63, 88), respectively. Treated horses generally showed a decrease in plasma ACTH. Plasma ACTH levels may be helpful when monitoring therapy of ECD, although improvement in clinical signs should be considered most important. There were no differences between cyproheptadine and pergolide in terms of improvements in any of the clinical signs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Equine Veterinary Journal Wiley

Plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) concentrations and clinical response in horses treated for equine Cushing's disease with cyproheptadine or pergolide

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2002 EVJ Ltd
ISSN
0425-1644
eISSN
2042-3306
D.O.I.
10.2746/042516402776250333
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Plasma ACTH levels have been variable in horses with a positive clinical response for therapy for equine Cushing's Disease (ECD). Therefore, our purpose was to determine the value of monitoring plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) levels during treatment of equine Cushing's disease (ECD) with either cyproheptadine (n = 32) or pergolide (n = 10). First, we validated the chemiluminescent ACTH assay (specificity, precision, accuracy, intra‐assay and interassay variations) and tested methods of handling the whole blood from the time of collection to when the ACTH was assayed. The sensitivity and specificity of high plasma ACTH levels for detecting ECD was determined in a retrospective study on hospitalised horses (n = 68). Surveys were sent to veterinarians who submitted equine ACTH levels that were high initially and had at least 2 ACTH samples to determine the value of monitoring ACTH levels during therapy of ECD. The ACTH chemiluminescent assay was valid. The ACTH was stable when whole blood was collected and held in plastic tubes for 8h before separating the plasma. The sensitivity and specificity of plasma ACTH levels for detecting ECD were 84% (n = 19, 95% CI 60, 97) and 78% (n = 49, 95% CI 63, 88), respectively. Treated horses generally showed a decrease in plasma ACTH. Plasma ACTH levels may be helpful when monitoring therapy of ECD, although improvement in clinical signs should be considered most important. There were no differences between cyproheptadine and pergolide in terms of improvements in any of the clinical signs.

Journal

Equine Veterinary JournalWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2002

References

  • Effective long‐term treatment of a suspected pituitary adenoma with bromocriptine mesylate in a pony
    Beck, Beck
  • Plasma adrenocorticotropin concentration in healthy horses and in horses with clinical signs of hyperadrenocorticism
    Couetil, Couetil; Paradis, Paradis; Knoll, Knoll
  • Radioimmunoassay of corticotropin from plasma
    Gutkowska, Gutkowska; Julesz, Julesz; St‐Louis, St‐Louis; Genest, Genest
  • On the stability in vitro of bioactive human adrenocorticotrophin in blood and plasma
    Lambert, Lambert; Frost, Frost; Ratcliffe, Ratcliffe; Robertson, Robertson
  • Equine Cushing's disease
    Love, Love
  • Pituitary‐independent Cushing's syndrome in a horse
    Kolk, Kolk

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