Plant functional types and ecological strategies in Patagonian forbs

Plant functional types and ecological strategies in Patagonian forbs Abstract. We identified four major functional types of forbs in the Patagonian steppe, taking into account phenological and morphological traits: (1) shallow‐rooted mesophytic species (annuals), (2) shallow‐rooted non‐mesophytic species, (3) deep‐rooted evergreen species, and (4) deep‐rooted deciduous species. The major attributes differentiating these groups were the date at which seasonal growth ended, rooting depth, sprouting depth, distance between shoots of the same plant, and degree of ‘mesophytism’. We used Cluster and Principal Components Analyses to identify the groups, and the attributes determining them. Late‐growth‐cycle types had deep roots and/or high ‘xerophytism’. Late‐cycle‐xerophytic types had a great sprouting depth, and late‐cycle‐deep‐rooted types had a great distance between shoots of the same plant. On the basis of current knowledge of the structure and functioning of the Patagonian steppe, we suggested three explanations to account for these correlations. 1. Late‐cycle forbs survive summer water deficit if they have xerophytic characteristics that reduce transpiration water losses, and/or they have deep roots that increase water uptake. 2. Sprouting depth results from the shift of active buds to dormant buds at the end of the cycle. Summer forbs have a great sprouting depth because only buds which are located deep in the soil survive hot and dry summers. 3. Distant shoots of summer forbs allow them simultaneously to use the high protection against desiccating winds provided by shrubs, and the ample water availability of bare soil patches. All the functional types of forbs depend on winter water recharge to begin their cycles, but each one completes its cycle by using a different portion of the water resources available in spring and summer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Plant functional types and ecological strategies in Patagonian forbs

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/plant-functional-types-and-ecological-strategies-in-patagonian-forbs-R1obyxQCp9
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1993 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
DOI
10.2307/3235623
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. We identified four major functional types of forbs in the Patagonian steppe, taking into account phenological and morphological traits: (1) shallow‐rooted mesophytic species (annuals), (2) shallow‐rooted non‐mesophytic species, (3) deep‐rooted evergreen species, and (4) deep‐rooted deciduous species. The major attributes differentiating these groups were the date at which seasonal growth ended, rooting depth, sprouting depth, distance between shoots of the same plant, and degree of ‘mesophytism’. We used Cluster and Principal Components Analyses to identify the groups, and the attributes determining them. Late‐growth‐cycle types had deep roots and/or high ‘xerophytism’. Late‐cycle‐xerophytic types had a great sprouting depth, and late‐cycle‐deep‐rooted types had a great distance between shoots of the same plant. On the basis of current knowledge of the structure and functioning of the Patagonian steppe, we suggested three explanations to account for these correlations. 1. Late‐cycle forbs survive summer water deficit if they have xerophytic characteristics that reduce transpiration water losses, and/or they have deep roots that increase water uptake. 2. Sprouting depth results from the shift of active buds to dormant buds at the end of the cycle. Summer forbs have a great sprouting depth because only buds which are located deep in the soil survive hot and dry summers. 3. Distant shoots of summer forbs allow them simultaneously to use the high protection against desiccating winds provided by shrubs, and the ample water availability of bare soil patches. All the functional types of forbs depend on winter water recharge to begin their cycles, but each one completes its cycle by using a different portion of the water resources available in spring and summer.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1993

References

  • Water use patterns of four co‐occurring chaparral shrubs
    Davis, Davis; Mooney, Mooney
  • Morphological analysis of herbaceous communities under different grazing regimes
    Diaz, Diaz; Acosta, Acosta; Cabido, Cabido
  • Guilds: the multiple meanings of a concept
    Hawkins, Hawkins; Mac Mahon, Mac Mahon
  • Adaptation of ecological systems: compositional patterns of species and morphological and functional traits
    Montalvo, Montalvo; Casado, Casado; Levassor, Levassor; Pineda, Pineda
  • Resource partitioning between shrubs and grasses in the Patagonian steppe
    Sala, Sala; Golluscio, Golluscio; Lauenroth, Lauenroth; Soriano, Soriano

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off