Plant functional traits and environmental filters at a regional scale

Plant functional traits and environmental filters at a regional scale Abstract. Links between plant traits and the environment, i.e. sets of plant attributes consistently associated with certain environmental conditions, are the consequence of the filtering effect of climatic, disturbance and biotic conditions. These filters determine which components of a species pool are assembled into local communities. We aimed at testing for consistent association between plant traits and climatic conditions along a steep regional gradient, divided into 13 climatically homogeneous sectors, in central‐western Argentina. We analyzed 19 vegetative and regeneration traits of the 100 most abundant species along the gradient. For each trait, we tested for homogeneity of frequencies of different categories between sectors and the regional species pool, using the χ2 statistic. We rejected H0 in 71% of the pair‐wise comparisons, which strongly suggests a ‘filtering effect’ of climatic factors on key plant functions. Vegetative traits were filtered more often than regeneration traits. Specific leaf area, life span, ramification, canopy height, leaf weight ratio, carbon investment into support tissue and pollination mode were the traits showing differences in the largest number of pair‐wise comparisons. This is probably the first attempt to detect, on a quantitative, statistically conservative basis, consistent linkages between climatic factors and numerous plant traits, over a broad spectrum of environmental conditions and plant growth forms. We discuss the advantages and limitations of this approach in predicting vegetation structure and functioning under present environmental conditions, and those expected for the next century as a consequence of global change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Plant functional traits and environmental filters at a regional scale

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/plant-functional-traits-and-environmental-filters-at-a-regional-scale-5ox3ip00Jh
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1998 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
DOI
10.2307/3237229
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Links between plant traits and the environment, i.e. sets of plant attributes consistently associated with certain environmental conditions, are the consequence of the filtering effect of climatic, disturbance and biotic conditions. These filters determine which components of a species pool are assembled into local communities. We aimed at testing for consistent association between plant traits and climatic conditions along a steep regional gradient, divided into 13 climatically homogeneous sectors, in central‐western Argentina. We analyzed 19 vegetative and regeneration traits of the 100 most abundant species along the gradient. For each trait, we tested for homogeneity of frequencies of different categories between sectors and the regional species pool, using the χ2 statistic. We rejected H0 in 71% of the pair‐wise comparisons, which strongly suggests a ‘filtering effect’ of climatic factors on key plant functions. Vegetative traits were filtered more often than regeneration traits. Specific leaf area, life span, ramification, canopy height, leaf weight ratio, carbon investment into support tissue and pollination mode were the traits showing differences in the largest number of pair‐wise comparisons. This is probably the first attempt to detect, on a quantitative, statistically conservative basis, consistent linkages between climatic factors and numerous plant traits, over a broad spectrum of environmental conditions and plant growth forms. We discuss the advantages and limitations of this approach in predicting vegetation structure and functioning under present environmental conditions, and those expected for the next century as a consequence of global change.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1998

References

  • Plant functional types and climate at the global scale
    Box, Box
  • The mineral nutrition of wild plants
    Chapin, Chapin
  • Assembly and response rules: two goals for predictive community ecology
    Keddy, Keddy
  • Implementation of a hierarchical global vegetation classification in ecosystem function models
    Nemani, Nemani; Running, Running
  • A functional classification for predicting the dynamics of landscapes
    Noble, Noble; Gitay, Gitay
  • Chemical composition of 24 wild species differing in relative growth rate
    Poorter, Poorter; Bergkotte, Bergkotte
  • Plant functional types and climate in a southern African savanna
    Skarpe, Skarpe
  • Biodiversity and ecological redundancy
    Walker, Walker
  • Carr texture in Britain and New Zealand: community convergence compared with a null model
    Wilson, Wilson; Agnew, Agnew; Partridge, Partridge

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off