Pinnaplasty: improved access to the antihelical fold

Pinnaplasty: improved access to the antihelical fold Prominent ears affect a significant proportion of the population with some studies quoting rates of 5%. Many techniques have been described over the years including cartilage sparing, cartilage cutting, cartilage scoring and suturing. Some of the more recent techniques describe the efficacy of incisionless pinnaplasty in selected cases. Each technique has advantages and disadvantages with no overall consensus on the optimal technique. Pinnaplasty has several recognised complications including haematoma, infection, skin or cartilage necrosis, re‐protrusion, asymmetry, suture expulsion and keloid scarring.Studies have demonstrated the benefit to the postoperative shape of the antihelix using anterior scoring in association with Mustardé sutures. This combination is advocated by the lead author. The cartilage of the pinna receives its blood supply from the anterior and posterior perichondrial layers. Previously described techniques to access the anterior surface of the pinna require the lifting of a skin flap from the posterior surface of the pinna. This risks de‐vascularising the cartilage if the flap is raised over the helical rim or a step deformity if the auricular cartilage is cut.Technical noteA helical rim incision hidden beneath the anterior projection with an anterior skin flap can be lifted to approach the antihelical fold (Fig. ). With this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Otolaryngology Wiley

Pinnaplasty: improved access to the antihelical fold

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1749-4478
eISSN
1749-4486
D.O.I.
10.1111/coa.12811
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Prominent ears affect a significant proportion of the population with some studies quoting rates of 5%. Many techniques have been described over the years including cartilage sparing, cartilage cutting, cartilage scoring and suturing. Some of the more recent techniques describe the efficacy of incisionless pinnaplasty in selected cases. Each technique has advantages and disadvantages with no overall consensus on the optimal technique. Pinnaplasty has several recognised complications including haematoma, infection, skin or cartilage necrosis, re‐protrusion, asymmetry, suture expulsion and keloid scarring.Studies have demonstrated the benefit to the postoperative shape of the antihelix using anterior scoring in association with Mustardé sutures. This combination is advocated by the lead author. The cartilage of the pinna receives its blood supply from the anterior and posterior perichondrial layers. Previously described techniques to access the anterior surface of the pinna require the lifting of a skin flap from the posterior surface of the pinna. This risks de‐vascularising the cartilage if the flap is raised over the helical rim or a step deformity if the auricular cartilage is cut.Technical noteA helical rim incision hidden beneath the anterior projection with an anterior skin flap can be lifted to approach the antihelical fold (Fig. ). With this

Journal

Clinical OtolaryngologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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