Physiological effects of saline waters on zander

Physiological effects of saline waters on zander Rapid transfer of zander Stizostedion lucioperca to hypoosmotic brackish water (mean osmolality 230 mOsmol kg–1, c. 8 psu) significantly increased plasma chloride concentrations after 24 h compared to those transferred to fresh water, although plasma osmolality was not significantly affected. After 6 days, plasma osmolality was slightly elevated but stable plasma glucose and cortisol concentrations and blood haematocrit and haemoglobin suggest a lack of hormonal stress responses and resultant secondary effects. Rapid transfer of zander to a more saline environment, hyperosmotic to plasma (mean osmolality 462 mOsmol kg‐1, c. 16 psu) induced a greater increase in plasma osmolality and chloride concentrations within 24 h, with a further rise after 6 days exposure, but all fish maintained a state of hypo‐osmoregulation both 24 h and 6 days after transfer. The initial osmotic disturbance (at 24 h) was accompanied by increased plasma glucose, blood haematocrit and haemoglobin and a decreased mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), suggesting an adrenergic stress response, but these parameters fully recovered within 6 days of exposure to this hyperosmotic environment with MCHC rising to exceed the level in freshwater fish. Zander did not survive rapid transfer to more hyperosmotic conditions (750 or 1001 mOsmol kg‐1, 26‐35 psu), but they did survive exposure to simulated‘tidal cycles’ of rising and declining salinity, peaking after 6 h at c. 29 or 33 psu. Although osmotic disturbance was apparent after 6 h exposure and other physiological parameters suggested both adrenergic and corticosteroid components of a stress response, rapid recovery was apparent after return to fresh water. The results indicate that the zander, a non‐indigenous species in the U.K., has a high level of osmotic tolerance and a degree of hypo‐osmoregulation in saline environments not found in most stenohaline freshwater teleosts. This osmoregulatory ability could enable invasion of new U.K. river systems by using inshore marine environments of low salinity as saltwater bridges. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Fish Biology Wiley

Physiological effects of saline waters on zander

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1112
eISSN
1095-8649
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1095-8649.2001.tb00219.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rapid transfer of zander Stizostedion lucioperca to hypoosmotic brackish water (mean osmolality 230 mOsmol kg–1, c. 8 psu) significantly increased plasma chloride concentrations after 24 h compared to those transferred to fresh water, although plasma osmolality was not significantly affected. After 6 days, plasma osmolality was slightly elevated but stable plasma glucose and cortisol concentrations and blood haematocrit and haemoglobin suggest a lack of hormonal stress responses and resultant secondary effects. Rapid transfer of zander to a more saline environment, hyperosmotic to plasma (mean osmolality 462 mOsmol kg‐1, c. 16 psu) induced a greater increase in plasma osmolality and chloride concentrations within 24 h, with a further rise after 6 days exposure, but all fish maintained a state of hypo‐osmoregulation both 24 h and 6 days after transfer. The initial osmotic disturbance (at 24 h) was accompanied by increased plasma glucose, blood haematocrit and haemoglobin and a decreased mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), suggesting an adrenergic stress response, but these parameters fully recovered within 6 days of exposure to this hyperosmotic environment with MCHC rising to exceed the level in freshwater fish. Zander did not survive rapid transfer to more hyperosmotic conditions (750 or 1001 mOsmol kg‐1, 26‐35 psu), but they did survive exposure to simulated‘tidal cycles’ of rising and declining salinity, peaking after 6 h at c. 29 or 33 psu. Although osmotic disturbance was apparent after 6 h exposure and other physiological parameters suggested both adrenergic and corticosteroid components of a stress response, rapid recovery was apparent after return to fresh water. The results indicate that the zander, a non‐indigenous species in the U.K., has a high level of osmotic tolerance and a degree of hypo‐osmoregulation in saline environments not found in most stenohaline freshwater teleosts. This osmoregulatory ability could enable invasion of new U.K. river systems by using inshore marine environments of low salinity as saltwater bridges.

Journal

Journal of Fish BiologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2001

References

  • The zander in perspective
    Linfield, Linfield; Rickards, Rickards
  • Diel changes in the vertical distribution of juvenile fish in the Zeeschelde Estuary
    Maes, Maes; Pas, Pas; Taillieu, Taillieu; Damme, Damme; Ollevier, Ollevier
  • Cortisol in teleosts: dynamics, mechanisms of action, and metabolic regulation
    Mommsen, Mommsen; Vijayan, Vijayan; Moon, Moon
  • High blood cortisol levels and low cortisol receptor affinity: Is the chub, Leuciscus cephalus , a cortisol‐resistant teleost
    Pottinger, Pottinger; Carrick, Carrick; Appleby, Appleby; Yeomans, Yeomans
  • Environmental factors as forces structuring the fish community of the Elbe estuary
    Thiel, Thiel; Sepulveda, Sepulveda; Kafemann, Kafemann; Nellen, Nellen

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