Physics‐based hydrologic‐response simulation: foundation for hydroecology and hydrogeomorphology

Physics‐based hydrologic‐response simulation: foundation for hydroecology and hydrogeomorphology Keith Loague1 * Christopher S. Heppner1 Benjamin B. Mirus1 Brian A. Ebel1 Qihua Ran1 Adrianne E. Carr1 Susan H. BeVille1 and Joel E. VanderKwaak2 Concept-Development Simulation Two emerging and important disciplines within the large science of hydrology are hydroecology (Eagleson, 2002; Rodriguez-Iturbe and Porporato, 2004) and hydrogeomorphology (Sidle and Onda, 2004), each requiring an integrated understanding of hydrologic response at the surface and within the variably saturated subsurface. Obviously, the most useful tool for understanding ecological or geomorphic processes within a given hydrologically driven system is careful observation via detailed field measurements/experiments (e.g. Montgomery et al., 2002; Loheide and Gorelick, 2005). However, simulation of hydrologic response with comprehensive physics-based models can provide a strong foundation for concept development in both hydroecology and hydrogeomorphology. The simulation of hydrologic response has received considerable attention in the last half century (see Beven (2000, 2002) and Singh and Woolhiser (2002)). In an often cited paper, Freeze and Harlan (1969) proposed a blueprint for a distributed physically based hydrologic model, based upon numerical solution to the coupled partial differential equations that describe water movement on the surface and within the variably saturated subsurface. At least three hydrologic-response models have been developed in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hydrological Processes Wiley

Physics‐based hydrologic‐response simulation: foundation for hydroecology and hydrogeomorphology

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0885-6087
eISSN
1099-1085
D.O.I.
10.1002/hyp.6179
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Keith Loague1 * Christopher S. Heppner1 Benjamin B. Mirus1 Brian A. Ebel1 Qihua Ran1 Adrianne E. Carr1 Susan H. BeVille1 and Joel E. VanderKwaak2 Concept-Development Simulation Two emerging and important disciplines within the large science of hydrology are hydroecology (Eagleson, 2002; Rodriguez-Iturbe and Porporato, 2004) and hydrogeomorphology (Sidle and Onda, 2004), each requiring an integrated understanding of hydrologic response at the surface and within the variably saturated subsurface. Obviously, the most useful tool for understanding ecological or geomorphic processes within a given hydrologically driven system is careful observation via detailed field measurements/experiments (e.g. Montgomery et al., 2002; Loheide and Gorelick, 2005). However, simulation of hydrologic response with comprehensive physics-based models can provide a strong foundation for concept development in both hydroecology and hydrogeomorphology. The simulation of hydrologic response has received considerable attention in the last half century (see Beven (2000, 2002) and Singh and Woolhiser (2002)). In an often cited paper, Freeze and Harlan (1969) proposed a blueprint for a distributed physically based hydrologic model, based upon numerical solution to the coupled partial differential equations that describe water movement on the surface and within the variably saturated subsurface. At least three hydrologic-response models have been developed in the

Journal

Hydrological ProcessesWiley

Published: Mar 30, 2006

References

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