Physical growth and diets of school children: Trends from 2001 to 2015 in rural West Java, Indonesia

Physical growth and diets of school children: Trends from 2001 to 2015 in rural West Java, Indonesia INTRODUCTIONImprovements in socioeconomic status and the health environment, especially after World War II, increased physical growth in developed countries (Bogin, ; Eveleth and Tanner, ) in ‘secular trends’ of growth. By contrast with some developed countries where physical growth had already stagnated (Kurokawa et al., ; Zellner et al., ), secular trends are in early stages in developing countries (Jaruratanasirikul & Sriplung, ; Zong et al., ).Indonesia, the fourth most populous country in the world, experienced rapid economic growth following the economic crisis in 1998, and is now experiencing a rapid health transition. According to studies by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1990 and 2010, the dominant disease burden changed from communicable diseases to non‐communicable diseases (Global Burden of Disease Profiles, ). Life expectancies in years have steadily increased from 62 to 69 for men and from 65 to 73 for women over the past two decades in Indonesia.Since 2000, we have conducted nutrition and health surveys in the rural Sundanese village of Sukajadi in West Java, Indonesia, particularly for children (Sekiyama et al., ). One of the most important findings was that child growth before the onset of puberty was retarded because of poor nutritional intake and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Human Biology Wiley

Physical growth and diets of school children: Trends from 2001 to 2015 in rural West Java, Indonesia

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1042-0533
eISSN
1520-6300
D.O.I.
10.1002/ajhb.23089
Publisher site
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Abstract

INTRODUCTIONImprovements in socioeconomic status and the health environment, especially after World War II, increased physical growth in developed countries (Bogin, ; Eveleth and Tanner, ) in ‘secular trends’ of growth. By contrast with some developed countries where physical growth had already stagnated (Kurokawa et al., ; Zellner et al., ), secular trends are in early stages in developing countries (Jaruratanasirikul & Sriplung, ; Zong et al., ).Indonesia, the fourth most populous country in the world, experienced rapid economic growth following the economic crisis in 1998, and is now experiencing a rapid health transition. According to studies by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1990 and 2010, the dominant disease burden changed from communicable diseases to non‐communicable diseases (Global Burden of Disease Profiles, ). Life expectancies in years have steadily increased from 62 to 69 for men and from 65 to 73 for women over the past two decades in Indonesia.Since 2000, we have conducted nutrition and health surveys in the rural Sundanese village of Sukajadi in West Java, Indonesia, particularly for children (Sekiyama et al., ). One of the most important findings was that child growth before the onset of puberty was retarded because of poor nutritional intake and

Journal

American Journal of Human BiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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