Phylogeography, genetic structure, and diversity in the dhole ( Cuon alpinus )

Phylogeography, genetic structure, and diversity in the dhole ( Cuon alpinus ) The Asiatic wild dog or dhole was once very widely distributed across Asia but now has a very fragmented range. In this first genetic study of this little‐known species, we obtained information on genetic diversity, phylogeography, and social structure using both mitochondrial control region sequencing and microsatellite genotyping of noninvasive faecal samples from wild populations, as well as from museum and captive samples. A pattern largely consistent with isolation by distance across the Asian mainland was observed, with no clear subspecies distinctions. However, two major phylogeographical groupings were found across the mainland, one extending from South, Central, and North India (south of the Ganges) into Myanmar, and the other extending from India north of the Ganges into northeastern India, Myanmar, Thailand and the Malaysian Peninsula. We propose a scenario involving glaciation events that could explain this pattern. The origin of the dhole populations in Sumatra and Java is enigmatic and requires further study. Very low levels of genetic diversity were observed among wild dholes from Baluran National Park in Java, Indonesia, but in contrast, high levels were observed in Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary in South India. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Ecology Wiley

Phylogeography, genetic structure, and diversity in the dhole ( Cuon alpinus )

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0962-1083
eISSN
1365-294X
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-294X.2005.02582.x
pmid
15969714
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Asiatic wild dog or dhole was once very widely distributed across Asia but now has a very fragmented range. In this first genetic study of this little‐known species, we obtained information on genetic diversity, phylogeography, and social structure using both mitochondrial control region sequencing and microsatellite genotyping of noninvasive faecal samples from wild populations, as well as from museum and captive samples. A pattern largely consistent with isolation by distance across the Asian mainland was observed, with no clear subspecies distinctions. However, two major phylogeographical groupings were found across the mainland, one extending from South, Central, and North India (south of the Ganges) into Myanmar, and the other extending from India north of the Ganges into northeastern India, Myanmar, Thailand and the Malaysian Peninsula. We propose a scenario involving glaciation events that could explain this pattern. The origin of the dhole populations in Sumatra and Java is enigmatic and requires further study. Very low levels of genetic diversity were observed among wild dholes from Baluran National Park in Java, Indonesia, but in contrast, high levels were observed in Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary in South India.

Journal

Molecular EcologyWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2005

References

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