Phylogenetic interpretation of ontogenetic change: sorting out the actual and artefactual in an empirical case study of centrarchid fishes

Phylogenetic interpretation of ontogenetic change: sorting out the actual and artefactual in an... Hypothesized relationships between ontogenetic and phylogenetic change in morphological characters were empirically tested in centrarchid fishes by comparing observed patterns of character development with patterns of character evolution as inferred from a representative phylogenetic hypothesis. This phylogeny was based on 56–61 morphological characters that were polarized by outgroup comparison. Through these comparisons, evolutionary changes in character ontogeny were categorized in one of eight classes (terminal addition, terminal deletion, terminal substitution, non‐terminal addition, non‐terminal deletion, non‐terminal substitution, ontogenetic reversal and substitution). The relative frequencies of each of these classes provided an empirical basis from which assumptions underlying hypothesized relationships between ontogeny and phylogeny were tested. In order to test hypothesized relationships between ontogeny and phylogeny that involve assumptions about the relative frequencies of terminal change (e.g. the use of ontogeny as a homology criterion), two additional phylogenies were generated in which terminal addition and terminal deletion were maximized and minimized for all characters. Character state change interpreted from these phylogenies thus represents the maxima and minima of the frequency range of terminal addition and terminal deletion for the 8.7 × 1036 trees possible for centrarchids. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society Wiley

Phylogenetic interpretation of ontogenetic change: sorting out the actual and artefactual in an empirical case study of centrarchid fishes

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0024-4082
eISSN
1096-3642
DOI
10.1111/j.1096-3642.1993.tb00289.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hypothesized relationships between ontogenetic and phylogenetic change in morphological characters were empirically tested in centrarchid fishes by comparing observed patterns of character development with patterns of character evolution as inferred from a representative phylogenetic hypothesis. This phylogeny was based on 56–61 morphological characters that were polarized by outgroup comparison. Through these comparisons, evolutionary changes in character ontogeny were categorized in one of eight classes (terminal addition, terminal deletion, terminal substitution, non‐terminal addition, non‐terminal deletion, non‐terminal substitution, ontogenetic reversal and substitution). The relative frequencies of each of these classes provided an empirical basis from which assumptions underlying hypothesized relationships between ontogeny and phylogeny were tested. In order to test hypothesized relationships between ontogeny and phylogeny that involve assumptions about the relative frequencies of terminal change (e.g. the use of ontogeny as a homology criterion), two additional phylogenies were generated in which terminal addition and terminal deletion were maximized and minimized for all characters. Character state change interpreted from these phylogenies thus represents the maxima and minima of the frequency range of terminal addition and terminal deletion for the 8.7 × 1036 trees possible for centrarchids.

Journal

Zoological Journal of the Linnean SocietyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1993

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

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