Phylogenetic influences on hormone levels across the primate order

Phylogenetic influences on hormone levels across the primate order Adrenal and gonadal hormone levels were evaluated in representative species from Prosimii, Ceboidea, Cercopithecoidea, and Hominoidea to determine if endocrine activity was influenced by phylogenetic factors. Most small‐bodied New World primates had extremely high levels of cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone when compared with Old World primates. In contrast to the high hormone levels and diversity found in Ceboidea, Old World primates showed a more similar pattern of hormone secretion. Thus, this survey supports earlier reports indicating that the callitricids and smaller cebid monkeys have a distinctive hormone profile. Although higher hormone levels tended to be associated with lower body weight, this effect was not evident in all taxa, and there were many notable exceptions. When species differ from their predicted hormone levels based on phylogenetic heritage and body weight (e.g., titi monkeys), we must look for other biological factors that influence endocrine activity. © 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Primatology Wiley

Phylogenetic influences on hormone levels across the primate order

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/phylogenetic-influences-on-hormone-levels-across-the-primate-order-Y2bIh46e8u
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Adrenal and gonadal hormone levels were evaluated in representative species from Prosimii, Ceboidea, Cercopithecoidea, and Hominoidea to determine if endocrine activity was influenced by phylogenetic factors. Most small‐bodied New World primates had extremely high levels of cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone when compared with Old World primates. In contrast to the high hormone levels and diversity found in Ceboidea, Old World primates showed a more similar pattern of hormone secretion. Thus, this survey supports earlier reports indicating that the callitricids and smaller cebid monkeys have a distinctive hormone profile. Although higher hormone levels tended to be associated with lower body weight, this effect was not evident in all taxa, and there were many notable exceptions. When species differ from their predicted hormone levels based on phylogenetic heritage and body weight (e.g., titi monkeys), we must look for other biological factors that influence endocrine activity. © 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

American Journal of PrimatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1992

References

  • Agonistic rank, aggression, social context, and testosterone in male pigtail monkeys
    Bernstein, Bernstein; Rose, Rose; Gordon, Gordon; Grady, Grady
  • Testosterone changes during the period of adolescence in male rhesus monkeys ( Macaca mulatta )
    Bernstein, Bernstein; Ruehlmann, Ruehlmann; Judge, Judge; Lindquist, Lindquist; Weed, Weed
  • Reproduction in the vervet monkey ( Cercopithecus aethiops) : I. Testicular volume, testosterone, and seasonality
    Eley, Eley; Else, Else; Gulamhusein, Gulamhusein; Lequin, Lequin
  • Reproductive biology of Sykes and blue monkeys
    Else, Else; Eley, Eley; Suleman, Suleman; Lequin, Lequin
  • Male endocrine response to females: Effects of social cues in cynomolgus macaques
    Glick, Glick
  • Fertility in the male gorilla ( Gorilla gorilla) : Relationship to semen parameters and serum hormones
    Gould, Gould; Kling, Kling
  • Species differences in adrenocortical activity of New World primates: Response to dexamethasone suppression
    Mendoza, Mendoza; Moberg, Moberg
  • Serum levels of gonadotropins and gonadal steroids, including testosterone, during the menstrual cycle of the chimpanzee ( Pan troglodytes )
    Nadler, Nadler; Graham, Graham; Gosselin, Gosselin; Collins, Collins
  • The reproductive biology of capuchin monkeys
    Negle, Negle; Denari, Denari
  • Allometric scaling in comparative biology: Problems of concept and method
    Smith, Smith
  • Social influences on sexual maturation of female Saguinus oedipus oedipus
    Tardif, Tardif

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off