Photoabsorption and damage of OSG low‐k films by VUV emission at 140–160 nm

Photoabsorption and damage of OSG low‐k films by VUV emission at 140–160 nm INTRODUCTIONModern Ultra Large‐Scale Integration (ULSI) technology especially beyond the technological node <14–16 nm explores complex multi‐level interconnects. And problem of dielectrics for interconnects having very low dielectric constant (so‐called low‐k dielectrics) is one of the most important. At present, nanoporous organosilicate glass (OSG) or SiCOH films with dielectric constant lower than that of SiO2 (k < 3.9) are used as interlayer dielectrics. The films are deposited by Plasma‐Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) and Spin‐On Glass (SOG) techniques by using organosilicate and porogen precursors. Then special UV‐assisted and/or thermal curing leads to formation of porous OSG matrix of interconnected pores (of 1.5–5 nm diameters as a rule). The bulk material of pore walls is similar to amorphous SiO2 while the wall surface is covered with terminating SiCH3 groups that make the pore surface hydrophobic.Integration of the film into ULSI technology includes many steps a lot of which are potentially damaging. Damage during plasma processing is one of the most serious. The main damage is caused by radicals and VUV photons. While several technological approaches were developed to decrease radical‐induced damage, VUV photons penetrating deeply into low‐k films lead to the irreversible damage.The photon‐induced damage of OSG films by VUV radiation depends on the absorption http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plasma Processes and Polymers Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN
1612-8850
eISSN
1612-8869
D.O.I.
10.1002/ppap.201700166
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONModern Ultra Large‐Scale Integration (ULSI) technology especially beyond the technological node <14–16 nm explores complex multi‐level interconnects. And problem of dielectrics for interconnects having very low dielectric constant (so‐called low‐k dielectrics) is one of the most important. At present, nanoporous organosilicate glass (OSG) or SiCOH films with dielectric constant lower than that of SiO2 (k < 3.9) are used as interlayer dielectrics. The films are deposited by Plasma‐Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) and Spin‐On Glass (SOG) techniques by using organosilicate and porogen precursors. Then special UV‐assisted and/or thermal curing leads to formation of porous OSG matrix of interconnected pores (of 1.5–5 nm diameters as a rule). The bulk material of pore walls is similar to amorphous SiO2 while the wall surface is covered with terminating SiCH3 groups that make the pore surface hydrophobic.Integration of the film into ULSI technology includes many steps a lot of which are potentially damaging. Damage during plasma processing is one of the most serious. The main damage is caused by radicals and VUV photons. While several technological approaches were developed to decrease radical‐induced damage, VUV photons penetrating deeply into low‐k films lead to the irreversible damage.The photon‐induced damage of OSG films by VUV radiation depends on the absorption

Journal

Plasma Processes and PolymersWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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