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Phosphorus Improves Leaf Nutrient Concentrations in Wheat, Oat, and Cereal Rye

Phosphorus Improves Leaf Nutrient Concentrations in Wheat, Oat, and Cereal Rye AbbreviationsDAPdays after plantingDIdeionizedMore pasture managers are utilizing annual cereal grain species, such as winter wheat (Triticum astevum L.), oat (Avena sativa L.), and cereal rye (Secale cereal L.), as forage crops during the winter months to extend their growing and grazing seasons. These species can be planted late fall or early spring, allowing for forage biomass accumulation during months of reduced growth of perennial cool‐ and warm‐season grasses (Ball et al., 2015). Although winter annual forage crops provide biomass during winter and early spring months, they are the most prone to mineral imbalances in the leaf tissue, which could result in nutritional disorders within animals consuming the forage (Chelliah et al., 2008; Han, 2010). One critical nutritional disorder in grazing cattle (Bos taurus) is grass tetany (hypomagnesemia). Grass tetany is typically linked to low levels of Mg in the blood serum of cattle (Stewart et al., 1981). The lack of Mg in blood serum is directly associated with a balanced ratio of certain nutrient concentrations of the plant tissues consumed by the animal. The grass tetany ratio is calculated as K+/(Ca2+ + Mg2+) on an equivalent basis, and cattle become susceptible to grass tetany when the ratio is greater http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Phosphorus Improves Leaf Nutrient Concentrations in Wheat, Oat, and Cereal Rye

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2018.09.0038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsDAPdays after plantingDIdeionizedMore pasture managers are utilizing annual cereal grain species, such as winter wheat (Triticum astevum L.), oat (Avena sativa L.), and cereal rye (Secale cereal L.), as forage crops during the winter months to extend their growing and grazing seasons. These species can be planted late fall or early spring, allowing for forage biomass accumulation during months of reduced growth of perennial cool‐ and warm‐season grasses (Ball et al., 2015). Although winter annual forage crops provide biomass during winter and early spring months, they are the most prone to mineral imbalances in the leaf tissue, which could result in nutritional disorders within animals consuming the forage (Chelliah et al., 2008; Han, 2010). One critical nutritional disorder in grazing cattle (Bos taurus) is grass tetany (hypomagnesemia). Grass tetany is typically linked to low levels of Mg in the blood serum of cattle (Stewart et al., 1981). The lack of Mg in blood serum is directly associated with a balanced ratio of certain nutrient concentrations of the plant tissues consumed by the animal. The grass tetany ratio is calculated as K+/(Ca2+ + Mg2+) on an equivalent basis, and cattle become susceptible to grass tetany when the ratio is greater

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References