Phenomenological model for dispersed bubbly flow in pipes

Phenomenological model for dispersed bubbly flow in pipes An analytical approach to the problem of steady‐state, axisymmetrically disperesed, bubbly flow in pipes based on a zero equation turbulence model is discussed. The formulation incorporates recent experimental observations and introduces the effect of bubble size in a rudimentary way. The two‐phase mixture is modeled as a variabledensity single fluid assuming an empirical void distribution family. The turbulent shear stress is formed from the contributions of both the velocity and density variation, and the solution of the resulting Reynolds‐type equation yields the velocity profile of the flow. Predicted void fraction and velocity distributions agree well with experimental measurements. The main objective of the model is to predict the friction multiplier with minimal computational effort. The velocity profiles of this model agree reasonably well with experiments. Predictions for the friction multiplier are compared to six known and widely used correlations, as well as to experimental data. All the correlations severely underpredict the friction multiplier in the disperesed bubbly flow regime, while the results of our model agree well with the measurements, within the range of its validity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aiche Journal Wiley

Phenomenological model for dispersed bubbly flow in pipes

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Institute of Chemical Engineers
ISSN
0001-1541
eISSN
1547-5905
D.O.I.
10.1002/aic.690410103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An analytical approach to the problem of steady‐state, axisymmetrically disperesed, bubbly flow in pipes based on a zero equation turbulence model is discussed. The formulation incorporates recent experimental observations and introduces the effect of bubble size in a rudimentary way. The two‐phase mixture is modeled as a variabledensity single fluid assuming an empirical void distribution family. The turbulent shear stress is formed from the contributions of both the velocity and density variation, and the solution of the resulting Reynolds‐type equation yields the velocity profile of the flow. Predicted void fraction and velocity distributions agree well with experimental measurements. The main objective of the model is to predict the friction multiplier with minimal computational effort. The velocity profiles of this model agree reasonably well with experiments. Predictions for the friction multiplier are compared to six known and widely used correlations, as well as to experimental data. All the correlations severely underpredict the friction multiplier in the disperesed bubbly flow regime, while the results of our model agree well with the measurements, within the range of its validity.

Journal

Aiche JournalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1995

References

  • Frictional Pressure Drop in Two‐Phase Flow: B. An Approach through Similarity Analysis
    Dukler, Dukler; Wicks, Wicks; Cleveland, Cleveland
  • Fundamentals of the Hydrodynamic Mechanism of Splitting in Dispersion Processes
    Hinze, Hinze
  • Drag Coefficient and Relative Velocity in Bubbly, Droplet or Particulate Flows
    Ishii, Ishii; Zuber, Zuber
  • Heat Transfer in Particulate Flows
    Michaelides, Michaelides

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