Phase III randomized trial comparing intravenous to oral iron in patients with cancer‐related iron deficiency anemia not on erythropoiesis stimulating agents

Phase III randomized trial comparing intravenous to oral iron in patients with cancer‐related... 1INTRODUCTIONAnemia is common in patients with malignancy. Ludwig et al. performed a prospective survey in 15,367 European cancer patients, and found that at enrolment, the overall prevalence of anemia was 39.3% and patients who received chemotherapy had the highest incidence of anemia at 62.7%. Anemia in cancer patients is multifactorial; nutritional deficiencies (iron, vitamin B12 and folate) are important etiologies.Iron deficiency anemia is one of the commonest forms of nutritional anemia, characterized by inadequate iron stores. Iron deficiency can be a true or functional deficiency. The standard therapy for iron deficiency anemia is iron supplementation, most commonly by oral iron supplements. The established indications for parenteral, that is intravenous (IV) iron supplementation include failure of oral iron, intolerance to oral iron, a condition that confers refractoriness to oral iron (e.g., post‐gastrectomy, celiac disease, atrophic gastritis, H. pylori infection, etc.), need for rapid anemia reversal (e.g., late in pregnancy, chronic bleeding), with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA) in chronic renal failure patients and as a substitute for blood transfusions in persons who refuse blood products on religious grounds. In patients on cytotoxic chemotherapy, receiving ESA, who have concomitant iron deficiency or inadequate ESA response, iron supplementation is recommended. Several studies have shown http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology Wiley

Phase III randomized trial comparing intravenous to oral iron in patients with cancer‐related iron deficiency anemia not on erythropoiesis stimulating agents

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
ISSN
1743-7555
eISSN
1743-7563
D.O.I.
10.1111/ajco.12762
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1INTRODUCTIONAnemia is common in patients with malignancy. Ludwig et al. performed a prospective survey in 15,367 European cancer patients, and found that at enrolment, the overall prevalence of anemia was 39.3% and patients who received chemotherapy had the highest incidence of anemia at 62.7%. Anemia in cancer patients is multifactorial; nutritional deficiencies (iron, vitamin B12 and folate) are important etiologies.Iron deficiency anemia is one of the commonest forms of nutritional anemia, characterized by inadequate iron stores. Iron deficiency can be a true or functional deficiency. The standard therapy for iron deficiency anemia is iron supplementation, most commonly by oral iron supplements. The established indications for parenteral, that is intravenous (IV) iron supplementation include failure of oral iron, intolerance to oral iron, a condition that confers refractoriness to oral iron (e.g., post‐gastrectomy, celiac disease, atrophic gastritis, H. pylori infection, etc.), need for rapid anemia reversal (e.g., late in pregnancy, chronic bleeding), with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA) in chronic renal failure patients and as a substitute for blood transfusions in persons who refuse blood products on religious grounds. In patients on cytotoxic chemotherapy, receiving ESA, who have concomitant iron deficiency or inadequate ESA response, iron supplementation is recommended. Several studies have shown

Journal

Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical OncologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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