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Phantoms Of The Clinic: From Thought‐Transference To Projective Identification By Mikita Brottman . London, UK : Karnac Books , 2011 , 138 pp.

Phantoms Of The Clinic: From Thought‐Transference To Projective Identification By Mikita Brottman... Mikita Brottman's Phantoms of the Clinic is likely to evoke three kinds of responses. The reader who regards logic and science to be his guides will find the book naïve, mystifying, and odd. The reader who is poetically‐inclined and can hear the trees breathe will find the book charming, refreshing, and brave. And, the reader who is deft at passing “political‐correctness” as humility will find the book to be unusual, interesting and worthy of attention. Now, if you are a psychoanalyst, you might have surmised that these three imaginary readers reflect my own diverse reactions to Brottman's book. All I have done is to externalize my un‐integrated responses and deposited them into the psychic containers of the three imaginary readers. What was inside me has come to reside outside, not that such individuals might not exist in actuality. And, this conundrum touches upon the essence of a book that is strikingly mysterious and yet disarmingly familiar. The former results from the author's fierce loyalty to concepts such as telepathy, thought‐transference, and other “paranormal” phenomena. The latter arises from her honourable attempt to locate such occurrences in the context of psychoanalytic history, developmental theory, and clinical observation. While Brottman http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

Phantoms Of The Clinic: From Thought‐Transference To Projective Identification By Mikita Brottman . London, UK : Karnac Books , 2011 , 138 pp.

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.1434
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mikita Brottman's Phantoms of the Clinic is likely to evoke three kinds of responses. The reader who regards logic and science to be his guides will find the book naïve, mystifying, and odd. The reader who is poetically‐inclined and can hear the trees breathe will find the book charming, refreshing, and brave. And, the reader who is deft at passing “political‐correctness” as humility will find the book to be unusual, interesting and worthy of attention. Now, if you are a psychoanalyst, you might have surmised that these three imaginary readers reflect my own diverse reactions to Brottman's book. All I have done is to externalize my un‐integrated responses and deposited them into the psychic containers of the three imaginary readers. What was inside me has come to reside outside, not that such individuals might not exist in actuality. And, this conundrum touches upon the essence of a book that is strikingly mysterious and yet disarmingly familiar. The former results from the author's fierce loyalty to concepts such as telepathy, thought‐transference, and other “paranormal” phenomena. The latter arises from her honourable attempt to locate such occurrences in the context of psychoanalytic history, developmental theory, and clinical observation. While Brottman

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2015

References