PERSON‐SITUATION SELECTION: A REVIEW OF SOME ABILITY‐SITUATION INTERACTION RESEARCH

PERSON‐SITUATION SELECTION: A REVIEW OF SOME ABILITY‐SITUATION INTERACTION RESEARCH A review of literatures thought to be relevant for understanding situational contributions to ability‐performance relationships was conducted. The review suggested that only three sets of variables, incentive systems, job characteristics, and leadership style/management philosophy (“climates”) have recieved research attention from an ability/situation vantage point. It was also shown that in both experimental and survey research these three factors can moderate ability‐performance relationships. Because these same three sets of variables are also known to have main effects on average performance levels, an hypothesis is presented that when organizations establish work conditions which facilitate the display of task‐relevant individual ability, then validity for ability measures, average performance levels, and general levels of satisfaction will all be high. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

PERSON‐SITUATION SELECTION: A REVIEW OF SOME ABILITY‐SITUATION INTERACTION RESEARCH

Personnel Psychology, Volume 31 (2) – Jun 1, 1978

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1978 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.1978.tb00447.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A review of literatures thought to be relevant for understanding situational contributions to ability‐performance relationships was conducted. The review suggested that only three sets of variables, incentive systems, job characteristics, and leadership style/management philosophy (“climates”) have recieved research attention from an ability/situation vantage point. It was also shown that in both experimental and survey research these three factors can moderate ability‐performance relationships. Because these same three sets of variables are also known to have main effects on average performance levels, an hypothesis is presented that when organizations establish work conditions which facilitate the display of task‐relevant individual ability, then validity for ability measures, average performance levels, and general levels of satisfaction will all be high.

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1978

References

  • The validity of aptitude tests in personnel selection
    Ghiselli, Ghiselli
  • Ability as a moderator of the relationship between job attitudes and job performance
    Lawler, Lawler
  • Organizational climates: An essay
    Schneider, Schneider

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