Periodontal conditions among the old elderly: five‐year longitudinal study

Periodontal conditions among the old elderly: five‐year longitudinal study ABSTRACT In the past three decades, there has been a significant rise in the number of old elderly (85+ years old) in Finland, and more of these individuals are retaining their natural teeth. Numerous cross‐sectional studies have reported on the periodontal health of the elderly (aged 75+), but very few long‐term follow‐ups have been reported. This study forms a part of the population‐based Helsinki Aging Study (HAS) and compares the periodontal health status and the treatment needs at baseline with those of the same population five years later. The baseline study, in 1990–91, examined the dentate elderly born in 1904, 1909, and 1914, living in Helsinki, Finland (n = 196). The follow‐up study was completed in 1995–96 (n = 73). Periodontal status was recorded by means of the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) in 175 dentate subjects (55 males and 120 females) who met the criteria at baseline, and in 57 dentate elderly (17 males and 40 females), aged 81, 86, and 91 years, who remained at follow‐up. Among the 57 dentate elderly who participated in both baseline and follow‐up examinations, the mean number of teeth decreased from 15.9 to 15.1, and the mean number of remaining sextants from 4.2 to 3.7. There were minor changes in the periodontal health status during this five‐year period, with an increase in code 2 (from 43% to 58%) and a decrease in code 3 (from 38% to 25%). Nevertheless, the overall treatment needs remained unchanged. It can be concluded that the periodontal health of the elderly had remained stable for 5 years, and almost no change was observed in their treatment needs. Therefore, periodontal disease in the elderly who are relatively healthy is not caused by the aging process. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Special Care in Dentistry Wiley

Periodontal conditions among the old elderly: five‐year longitudinal study

Special Care in Dentistry, Volume 21 (2) – Mar 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/periodontal-conditions-among-the-old-elderly-five-year-longitudinal-4JBmB6ujUJ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0275-1879
eISSN
1754-4505
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1754-4505.2001.tb00224.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT In the past three decades, there has been a significant rise in the number of old elderly (85+ years old) in Finland, and more of these individuals are retaining their natural teeth. Numerous cross‐sectional studies have reported on the periodontal health of the elderly (aged 75+), but very few long‐term follow‐ups have been reported. This study forms a part of the population‐based Helsinki Aging Study (HAS) and compares the periodontal health status and the treatment needs at baseline with those of the same population five years later. The baseline study, in 1990–91, examined the dentate elderly born in 1904, 1909, and 1914, living in Helsinki, Finland (n = 196). The follow‐up study was completed in 1995–96 (n = 73). Periodontal status was recorded by means of the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) in 175 dentate subjects (55 males and 120 females) who met the criteria at baseline, and in 57 dentate elderly (17 males and 40 females), aged 81, 86, and 91 years, who remained at follow‐up. Among the 57 dentate elderly who participated in both baseline and follow‐up examinations, the mean number of teeth decreased from 15.9 to 15.1, and the mean number of remaining sextants from 4.2 to 3.7. There were minor changes in the periodontal health status during this five‐year period, with an increase in code 2 (from 43% to 58%) and a decrease in code 3 (from 38% to 25%). Nevertheless, the overall treatment needs remained unchanged. It can be concluded that the periodontal health of the elderly had remained stable for 5 years, and almost no change was observed in their treatment needs. Therefore, periodontal disease in the elderly who are relatively healthy is not caused by the aging process.

Journal

Special Care in DentistryWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2001

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off