Perceived Service Quality and User Satisfaction with the Information Services Function *

Perceived Service Quality and User Satisfaction with the Information Services Function * A constant concern of management information systems (MIS) researchers and practitioners has been improving user satisfaction with the information services function (USISF). Due to the growth of end‐user computing, decentralization, and alternative sources of supply, an organization's information services function (ISF) is now faced with serving customers that possess substantial discretion in their use and purchase of information systems (IS) services. This increasingly market‐oriented environment demands sensitivity to IS customers' expectations and perceived value of ISF services. One important source of guidance in such an IS management environment is to look at marketing literature for frameworks that may permit the ISF to more effectively determine and convey the value of their services. Recognizing the need to improve existing MIS measures of user satisfaction with the ISF, this study adapts the SERVQUAL measure from marketing to provide more specific information about user satisfaction with the information service function. It was found that, while the three original dimensions of the traditional user information satisfaction (UIS) measure remain strong predictors of overall ISF user satisfaction, two aspects of IS service quality, “reliability” and “empathy,” are also significant predictors. The results suggest that the original dimensions of UIS may not be comprehensive enough to capture the more detailed dimensions of ISF service quality in SERVQUAL, and that the reliability and empathy dimensions of service quality may be needed to supplement the traditional UIS measure in determining user satisfaction with the information services function. Implications for research and practice resulting from these findings are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Decision Sciences Wiley

Perceived Service Quality and User Satisfaction with the Information Services Function *

Decision Sciences, Volume 25 (5‐6) – Sep 1, 1994

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0011-7315
eISSN
1540-5915
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1540-5915.1994.tb01868.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A constant concern of management information systems (MIS) researchers and practitioners has been improving user satisfaction with the information services function (USISF). Due to the growth of end‐user computing, decentralization, and alternative sources of supply, an organization's information services function (ISF) is now faced with serving customers that possess substantial discretion in their use and purchase of information systems (IS) services. This increasingly market‐oriented environment demands sensitivity to IS customers' expectations and perceived value of ISF services. One important source of guidance in such an IS management environment is to look at marketing literature for frameworks that may permit the ISF to more effectively determine and convey the value of their services. Recognizing the need to improve existing MIS measures of user satisfaction with the ISF, this study adapts the SERVQUAL measure from marketing to provide more specific information about user satisfaction with the information service function. It was found that, while the three original dimensions of the traditional user information satisfaction (UIS) measure remain strong predictors of overall ISF user satisfaction, two aspects of IS service quality, “reliability” and “empathy,” are also significant predictors. The results suggest that the original dimensions of UIS may not be comprehensive enough to capture the more detailed dimensions of ISF service quality in SERVQUAL, and that the reliability and empathy dimensions of service quality may be needed to supplement the traditional UIS measure in determining user satisfaction with the information services function. Implications for research and practice resulting from these findings are discussed.

Journal

Decision SciencesWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1994

References

  • An investigation of the information center from the user's perspective
    Brancheau, Brancheau; Vogel, Vogel; Wetherbe, Wetherbe
  • Some cautions on the measurement of user information satisfaction
    Galletta, Galletta; Lederer, Lederer
  • The measurement of user information satisfaction
    Ives, Ives; Olson, Olson; Baroudi, Baroudi
  • An investigation of equity as a determinant of user information satisfaction
    Joshi, Joshi
  • Perceived usefulness of information: A psychometric examination
    Larcker, Larcker; Lessig, Lessig
  • Cost‐benefit analysis in information systems development and operation
    King, King; Schrems, Schrems
  • Toward development of the end user computing construct in a university setting
    Rainer, Rainer; Harrison, Harrison
  • Test‐retest reliability of the end‐user computing satisfaction instrument
    Torkzadeh, Torkzadeh; Doll, Doll

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