Penetrating the Book‐to‐Market Black Box: The R&D Effect

Penetrating the Book‐to‐Market Black Box: The R&D Effect The book‐to‐market (BM) phenomenon – the positive association between BM and subsequent returns – looms large among capital market enigmas. Economic theory postulates that the difference between market and book values of companies reflects their future abnormal profits. We capture these abnormal profits for a large sample of science‐based companies by estimating the value of the off‐balance sheet investment generating those profits – the value of R&D capital – and show empirically: (i) Firms’ R&D capital is associated with their subsequent stock returns. (ii) For R&D intensive firms, this ‘R&D effect’ subsumes the ‘book‐to‐market effect.’ (iii) The association between R&D and subsequent returns appears to result from an extra‐market risk factor inherent in R&D, rather than from stock mispricing. We thus provide an explanation for the book‐to‐market phenomenon of R&D companies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Business Finance & Accounting Wiley

Penetrating the Book‐to‐Market Black Box: The R&D Effect

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/penetrating-the-book-to-market-black-box-the-r-d-effect-lnxCHGxzha
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0306-686X
eISSN
1468-5957
D.O.I.
10.1111/1468-5957.00262
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The book‐to‐market (BM) phenomenon – the positive association between BM and subsequent returns – looms large among capital market enigmas. Economic theory postulates that the difference between market and book values of companies reflects their future abnormal profits. We capture these abnormal profits for a large sample of science‐based companies by estimating the value of the off‐balance sheet investment generating those profits – the value of R&D capital – and show empirically: (i) Firms’ R&D capital is associated with their subsequent stock returns. (ii) For R&D intensive firms, this ‘R&D effect’ subsumes the ‘book‐to‐market effect.’ (iii) The association between R&D and subsequent returns appears to result from an extra‐market risk factor inherent in R&D, rather than from stock mispricing. We thus provide an explanation for the book‐to‐market phenomenon of R&D companies.

Journal

Journal of Business Finance & AccountingWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off