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Peer Salaries and Gender Differences in Job Satisfaction in the Workplace

Peer Salaries and Gender Differences in Job Satisfaction in the Workplace A substantial and persistent earnings gap exists between male and female employees in Britain. Despite this gap, British women typically report higher levels of job satisfaction than men. We consider this apparent contradiction by asking whether the higher job satisfaction reported by female employees is associated with their being less concerned by the level of co‐worker wages. We explore the relationship between reported job satisfaction and own, relative and comparison‐group wage; allowing for asymmetry in responses across genders. We find that choice of relevant comparison group is affected by gender; men display behaviour characteristic of competitiveness while women do not. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Manchester School Wiley

Peer Salaries and Gender Differences in Job Satisfaction in the Workplace

The Manchester School , Volume 83 (3) – Jun 1, 2015

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 The University of Manchester and John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1463-6786
eISSN
1467-9957
DOI
10.1111/manc.12060
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A substantial and persistent earnings gap exists between male and female employees in Britain. Despite this gap, British women typically report higher levels of job satisfaction than men. We consider this apparent contradiction by asking whether the higher job satisfaction reported by female employees is associated with their being less concerned by the level of co‐worker wages. We explore the relationship between reported job satisfaction and own, relative and comparison‐group wage; allowing for asymmetry in responses across genders. We find that choice of relevant comparison group is affected by gender; men display behaviour characteristic of competitiveness while women do not.

Journal

The Manchester SchoolWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2015

References