Pediatric cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: Impact on liver transplant outcomes

Pediatric cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: Impact on liver transplant outcomes In adults, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM) has a significant incidence and impact on liver transplantation. For pediatric liver transplantation (pLT), data on liver‐induced cardiac changes are scarce, and in particular, the comparison between cirrhotic and noncirrhotic liver disease has not been investigated. We retrospectively evaluated cardiac changes associated with CCM by echocardiography and 12‐lead electrocardiogram in 198 pLT‐candidates (median age 4.1 years) 4.2 before and 12 months after pLT. Results were correlated with the stage of liver fibrosis and cholestasis before transplantation. The left ventricular end‐diastolic diameter (LVIDd) z score, left ventricular mass z score, and left ventricular mass index were significantly higher in cirrhotic patients (‐0.10 versus 0.98, P < 0.001; ‐1.55 versus ‐0.42, P = 0.001; 78.99 versus 125.64 g/m2, P = 0.001, respectively) compared with children with noncirrhotic liver disease. Pathological z scores (>2SDS) for the LVIDd occurred more frequently in cirrhotic patients compared with patients with noncirrhotic liver disease (31/169 versus 1/29; P = 0.03) and were significantly associated with cholestasis. All observed cardiac changes were reversible 1 year after pLT. Pathological LVIDd z scores correlated highly with intensive care unit (ICU) stay (9.6 days versus 17.1 days, respectively, P = 0.002) but not with patient survival pre‐LT or post‐LT. In contrast to other studies, prolonged QTc time was not associated with liver cirrhosis in our patients. In conclusion, CCM‐associated cardiac changes in pLT candidates with cirrhotic liver disease are frequent, mild, and associated with cholestasis and reversible after pLT. They may impact peritransplant care and posttransplant hospitalization time. Further prospective evaluation is warranted. In particular, for QTc time prolongation etiological factors, possible protective effects of ursodeoxycholic acid treatment and the use as a screening parameter for CCM should be verified. Liver Transplantation 24 820–830 2018 AASLD. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Liver Transplantation Wiley

Pediatric cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: Impact on liver transplant outcomes

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/pediatric-cirrhotic-cardiomyopathy-impact-on-liver-transplant-outcomes-jkneLi3XQU
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.
ISSN
1527-6465
eISSN
1527-6473
D.O.I.
10.1002/lt.25076
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In adults, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM) has a significant incidence and impact on liver transplantation. For pediatric liver transplantation (pLT), data on liver‐induced cardiac changes are scarce, and in particular, the comparison between cirrhotic and noncirrhotic liver disease has not been investigated. We retrospectively evaluated cardiac changes associated with CCM by echocardiography and 12‐lead electrocardiogram in 198 pLT‐candidates (median age 4.1 years) 4.2 before and 12 months after pLT. Results were correlated with the stage of liver fibrosis and cholestasis before transplantation. The left ventricular end‐diastolic diameter (LVIDd) z score, left ventricular mass z score, and left ventricular mass index were significantly higher in cirrhotic patients (‐0.10 versus 0.98, P < 0.001; ‐1.55 versus ‐0.42, P = 0.001; 78.99 versus 125.64 g/m2, P = 0.001, respectively) compared with children with noncirrhotic liver disease. Pathological z scores (>2SDS) for the LVIDd occurred more frequently in cirrhotic patients compared with patients with noncirrhotic liver disease (31/169 versus 1/29; P = 0.03) and were significantly associated with cholestasis. All observed cardiac changes were reversible 1 year after pLT. Pathological LVIDd z scores correlated highly with intensive care unit (ICU) stay (9.6 days versus 17.1 days, respectively, P = 0.002) but not with patient survival pre‐LT or post‐LT. In contrast to other studies, prolonged QTc time was not associated with liver cirrhosis in our patients. In conclusion, CCM‐associated cardiac changes in pLT candidates with cirrhotic liver disease are frequent, mild, and associated with cholestasis and reversible after pLT. They may impact peritransplant care and posttransplant hospitalization time. Further prospective evaluation is warranted. In particular, for QTc time prolongation etiological factors, possible protective effects of ursodeoxycholic acid treatment and the use as a screening parameter for CCM should be verified. Liver Transplantation 24 820–830 2018 AASLD.

Journal

Liver TransplantationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off