PAY PREFERENCES AND JOB SEARCH DECISIONS: A PERSON‐ORGANIZATION FIT PERSPECTIVE

PAY PREFERENCES AND JOB SEARCH DECISIONS: A PERSON‐ORGANIZATION FIT PERSPECTIVE The present study investigated the degree to which pay preferences influenced job search decisions in both hypothetical and actual organizations, and the degree to which preferences for particular compensation attributes depended on job seekers' dispositional characteristics. Based on prior theory and research, we hypothesized that certain pay systems generally would be preferred by job seekers, that these pay systems would affect applicant attraction to organizations, and that different types of job seekers would be attracted to different types of pay systems. The sample comprised 171 college students who were seeking jobs during the study, and who represented six majors, three degree types, and two degree levels. Experimental policy‐capturing results and results obtained about actual companies with which the job seekers would potentially interview supported hypotheses that organizations perceived to offer high pay levels, flexible benefits, individual‐based pay, and fixed pay policies were more attractive to job seekers. Results further suggested that the attractiveness of these pay policies may be heightened by greater levels of fit between individual personality traits and compensation system characteristics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

PAY PREFERENCES AND JOB SEARCH DECISIONS: A PERSON‐ORGANIZATION FIT PERSPECTIVE

Personnel Psychology, Volume 47 (2) – Jun 1, 1994

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.1994.tb01727.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study investigated the degree to which pay preferences influenced job search decisions in both hypothetical and actual organizations, and the degree to which preferences for particular compensation attributes depended on job seekers' dispositional characteristics. Based on prior theory and research, we hypothesized that certain pay systems generally would be preferred by job seekers, that these pay systems would affect applicant attraction to organizations, and that different types of job seekers would be attracted to different types of pay systems. The sample comprised 171 college students who were seeking jobs during the study, and who represented six majors, three degree types, and two degree levels. Experimental policy‐capturing results and results obtained about actual companies with which the job seekers would potentially interview supported hypotheses that organizations perceived to offer high pay levels, flexible benefits, individual‐based pay, and fixed pay policies were more attractive to job seekers. Results further suggested that the attractiveness of these pay policies may be heightened by greater levels of fit between individual personality traits and compensation system characteristics.

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1994

References

  • The impact of flexible benefits on employee satisfaction: A field study
    Barber, Barber; Dunham, Dunham; Formisano, Formisano
  • Do the people make the place? An examination of the attraction‐selection‐attrition hypothesis
    Bretz, Bretz; Ash, Ash; Dreher, Dreher
  • Organizational behavior: Linking individuals and groups to organizational contexts
    Mowday, Mowday; Sutton, Sutton
  • Organizational staffing: Integrating practice with strategy
    Olian, Olian; Rynes, Rynes

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