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Paul Collins : A Very Contrary Irishman: The Life and Journeys of Jeremiah O'Flynn . Melbourne : Morning Star Publishing , 2014 ; pp. vi + 211.

Paul Collins : A Very Contrary Irishman: The Life and Journeys of Jeremiah O'Flynn . Melbourne :... It is sometimes easy to forget, in the light of Paul Collins' quite diverse literary output, that his original academic work was historical, exploring the early history of the Catholic Church in Australia. This book is a welcome addition to the historiography on the subject. Collins' original doctoral thesis dealt with the period from about 1832. This book, the result of research gathered then “shelved” during that exercise, moves back into the Australia of 1817, as a major focus. On Sunday 9 November 1817, Father Jeremiah O'Flynn arrived in Australia, seemingly “out of the blue” as Sydney Historian Edmund Campion describes the event in his book, Australian Catholics (Melbourne: Viking Press, 1987). By May of 1818, O'Flynn was a deportee, loaded onto a ship bound for England, despite his Vatican commission as Prefect Apostolic of New Holland. Around his brief six months sojourn in the port of Sydney there grew up a legend that became part of the founding narrative of Catholicism in Australia. In particular, the O'Flynn myth became a key narrative for protagonists of the theory of sectarian anti‐Catholicism in the Australian colony as a major factor in its religious development. The Catholic legend‐makers made O'Flynn http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Religious History Wiley

Paul Collins : A Very Contrary Irishman: The Life and Journeys of Jeremiah O'Flynn . Melbourne : Morning Star Publishing , 2014 ; pp. vi + 211.

Journal of Religious History , Volume 39 (2) – Jun 1, 2015

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Journal of Religious History © 2015 Religious History Association
ISSN
0022-4227
eISSN
1467-9809
DOI
10.1111/1467-9809.12264
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is sometimes easy to forget, in the light of Paul Collins' quite diverse literary output, that his original academic work was historical, exploring the early history of the Catholic Church in Australia. This book is a welcome addition to the historiography on the subject. Collins' original doctoral thesis dealt with the period from about 1832. This book, the result of research gathered then “shelved” during that exercise, moves back into the Australia of 1817, as a major focus. On Sunday 9 November 1817, Father Jeremiah O'Flynn arrived in Australia, seemingly “out of the blue” as Sydney Historian Edmund Campion describes the event in his book, Australian Catholics (Melbourne: Viking Press, 1987). By May of 1818, O'Flynn was a deportee, loaded onto a ship bound for England, despite his Vatican commission as Prefect Apostolic of New Holland. Around his brief six months sojourn in the port of Sydney there grew up a legend that became part of the founding narrative of Catholicism in Australia. In particular, the O'Flynn myth became a key narrative for protagonists of the theory of sectarian anti‐Catholicism in the Australian colony as a major factor in its religious development. The Catholic legend‐makers made O'Flynn

Journal

Journal of Religious HistoryWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2015

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