Patients with and without intellectual disability seeking outpatient psychiatric services: diagnoses and prescribing pattern

Patients with and without intellectual disability seeking outpatient psychiatric services:... Background The present study examined the presenting problem of psychiatric outpatients, and resulting diagnostic and prescribing patterns, comparing patients with intellectual disability (ID) with non‐ID (N‐ID) patients seen in the same clinic. Methods This study was a retrospective medical chart review of information in the first psychiatric diagnostic evaluation for the most recent 100 adult patients with mild ID, 100 patients with moderate, severe or profound ID, and 100 matching N‐ID patients. Results There were significant differences in rates of medical illness, disabilities, history of marriage, children, independent living, and family history of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Individuals with ID were more likely to present with aggression, self‐injurious behaviour or physical complaints, whereas N‐ID subjects presented more frequently with depression and anxiety complaints. For all groups, depressive disorders were the most frequent class of diagnoses. For those with ID, antipsychotics were used in 32% of subjects, with mood stabilizers in 28% and antidepressants in 27%. The N‐ID subjects were most frequently prescribed antidepressants (40%) and anxiolytics (22%). Polypharmacy did not differ significantly among groups. Conclusions Psychiatric practitioners relied on the diagnostic examination to formulate their diagnosis, whereas the chief complaint reflected the view of caregivers of the subjects with ID. In contrast to previous studies, outpatient providers frequently diagnosed depression, and the prescribing pattern showed increased usage of antidepressants and mood stabilizers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Intellectual Disability Research Wiley

Patients with and without intellectual disability seeking outpatient psychiatric services: diagnoses and prescribing pattern

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/patients-with-and-without-intellectual-disability-seeking-outpatient-DypyIHpU12
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0964-2633
eISSN
1365-2788
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2788.2003.00463.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background The present study examined the presenting problem of psychiatric outpatients, and resulting diagnostic and prescribing patterns, comparing patients with intellectual disability (ID) with non‐ID (N‐ID) patients seen in the same clinic. Methods This study was a retrospective medical chart review of information in the first psychiatric diagnostic evaluation for the most recent 100 adult patients with mild ID, 100 patients with moderate, severe or profound ID, and 100 matching N‐ID patients. Results There were significant differences in rates of medical illness, disabilities, history of marriage, children, independent living, and family history of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Individuals with ID were more likely to present with aggression, self‐injurious behaviour or physical complaints, whereas N‐ID subjects presented more frequently with depression and anxiety complaints. For all groups, depressive disorders were the most frequent class of diagnoses. For those with ID, antipsychotics were used in 32% of subjects, with mood stabilizers in 28% and antidepressants in 27%. The N‐ID subjects were most frequently prescribed antidepressants (40%) and anxiolytics (22%). Polypharmacy did not differ significantly among groups. Conclusions Psychiatric practitioners relied on the diagnostic examination to formulate their diagnosis, whereas the chief complaint reflected the view of caregivers of the subjects with ID. In contrast to previous studies, outpatient providers frequently diagnosed depression, and the prescribing pattern showed increased usage of antidepressants and mood stabilizers.

Journal

Journal of Intellectual Disability ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2003

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off