Patient turnover and the relationship between nurse staffing and patient outcomes

Patient turnover and the relationship between nurse staffing and patient outcomes High patient turnover (patient throughput generated by admissions, discharges, and transfers) contributes to increased demands and resources for care. We examined how the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing and failure‐to‐rescue (FTR) varied with patient turnover levels by analyzing quarterly data from the University HealthSystem Consortium. The data included 42 hospitals, representing 759 nursing units and about 1 million inpatients. Higher RN staffing was associated with lower FTR. When patient turnover increased from 48.6% to 60.7% on nonintensive units (non‐ICUs), the beneficial effect of non‐ICU RN staffing on FTR was reduced by 11.5%. RN staffing should be adjusted according to patient turnover because turnover increases patient care demand beyond that presented by patient count, and outcomes may be adversely affected. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 35:277–288, 2012 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Nursing & Health Wiley

Patient turnover and the relationship between nurse staffing and patient outcomes

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/patient-turnover-and-the-relationship-between-nurse-staffing-and-u6BBi95Gqe
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0160-6891
eISSN
1098-240X
DOI
10.1002/nur.21474
pmid
22457013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

High patient turnover (patient throughput generated by admissions, discharges, and transfers) contributes to increased demands and resources for care. We examined how the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing and failure‐to‐rescue (FTR) varied with patient turnover levels by analyzing quarterly data from the University HealthSystem Consortium. The data included 42 hospitals, representing 759 nursing units and about 1 million inpatients. Higher RN staffing was associated with lower FTR. When patient turnover increased from 48.6% to 60.7% on nonintensive units (non‐ICUs), the beneficial effect of non‐ICU RN staffing on FTR was reduced by 11.5%. RN staffing should be adjusted according to patient turnover because turnover increases patient care demand beyond that presented by patient count, and outcomes may be adversely affected. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 35:277–288, 2012

Journal

Research in Nursing & HealthWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2012

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off