Pathological outcomes in rectal cancer following laparoscopic surgery

Pathological outcomes in rectal cancer following laparoscopic surgery 1INTRODUCTIONMultiple systematic reviews and meta‐analyses of randomized trials comparing laparoscopic and open rectal cancer resections have shown similar short‐ and long‐term outcomes between the two procedures. There remains a dearth of information, however, with respect to the role laparoscopic surgery plays in the routine surgical management of rectal cancer, particularly with respect to its ability to provide a safe pathological surgical outcome.The description of the perirectal fascia by Thomas Jonnesco has contributed significantly to the understanding of the surgical anatomy of the rectum, as has the work of Mike and Kano regarding laparoscopic anatomy. These contributions, together with the promotion of total mesorectal excision (TME) of the rectum by R.J. Heald, explain why rectal resection is regarded as a highly “specimen‐orientated” procedure. The identification of the correct anatomical plane to mobilize the extraperitoneal rectum with preservation of the perirectal fascia, avoiding injury to strategic neurovascular structures and ensuring adequate circumferential resection margin (CRM), produces a unique operative specimen. A detailed examination of the specimen by the pathologist provides not only important prognostic information but also may be used to evaluate the quality of surgery according to the key criteria of integrity of the perirectal fascial envelope, CRM clearance, lymph http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology Wiley

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/pathological-outcomes-in-rectal-cancer-following-laparoscopic-surgery-Hk7Kk0nB0a
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
ISSN
1743-7555
eISSN
1743-7563
D.O.I.
10.1111/ajco.12781
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1INTRODUCTIONMultiple systematic reviews and meta‐analyses of randomized trials comparing laparoscopic and open rectal cancer resections have shown similar short‐ and long‐term outcomes between the two procedures. There remains a dearth of information, however, with respect to the role laparoscopic surgery plays in the routine surgical management of rectal cancer, particularly with respect to its ability to provide a safe pathological surgical outcome.The description of the perirectal fascia by Thomas Jonnesco has contributed significantly to the understanding of the surgical anatomy of the rectum, as has the work of Mike and Kano regarding laparoscopic anatomy. These contributions, together with the promotion of total mesorectal excision (TME) of the rectum by R.J. Heald, explain why rectal resection is regarded as a highly “specimen‐orientated” procedure. The identification of the correct anatomical plane to mobilize the extraperitoneal rectum with preservation of the perirectal fascia, avoiding injury to strategic neurovascular structures and ensuring adequate circumferential resection margin (CRM), produces a unique operative specimen. A detailed examination of the specimen by the pathologist provides not only important prognostic information but also may be used to evaluate the quality of surgery according to the key criteria of integrity of the perirectal fascial envelope, CRM clearance, lymph

Journal

Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical OncologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off