Parvovirus B19 infection in patients with hemophilia

Parvovirus B19 infection in patients with hemophilia Background: The long‐term consequences of parvovirus B19 infection in transfusion recipients are not known, and thus the value of B19 screening of blood donors remains unresolved. Hemophiliacs, at risk for B19 through their chronic exposure to clotting factor concentrates, have frequent, close medical follow‐up and thereby constitute an ideal group in which to study the hematologic sequelae of B19 infection. Study Design and Methods: An enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect B19 IgG and IgM and the polymerase chain reaction was used to detect B19 DNA in frozen, stored plasma samples, obtained between 1987 and 1994, from 136 subjects with hemophilia, including 71 who were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)‐positive and 65 who were HIV‐ negative. Then the results of the tests were compared with clinical hematological data and blood product usage data. Results: B19 seroprevalence in the hemophilic cohort was 81.6 percent (111/136), including 74.6 percent (53/71) of HIV‐positive and 89.2 percent (58/65) of HIV‐negative hemophiliacs. It was not affected by age, type or severity of hemophilia, HIV status, CD4 number, or yearly blood product usage. Only 1 (0.7%) of the 136 samples was positive for B19 IgM and none was positive in polymerase chain reaction for B19 DNA. After adjusting for HIV status, there were no differences between B19‐ positive and B19‐negative hemophiliacs in hematologic values, CD4 counts, or blood product use. Conclusion: Although B19 IgG seroprevalence in this hemophilic cohort is high and indicative of past B19 infection, there is no detectable B19 viral activity or any associated long‐term clinical or hematologic sequelae. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transfusion Wiley

Parvovirus B19 infection in patients with hemophilia

Transfusion, Volume 36 (3) – Mar 1, 1996

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/parvovirus-b19-infection-in-patients-with-hemophilia-SKiTr2CkPq
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1996 AABB
ISSN
0041-1132
eISSN
1537-2995
DOI
10.1046/j.1537-2995.1996.36396182142.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background: The long‐term consequences of parvovirus B19 infection in transfusion recipients are not known, and thus the value of B19 screening of blood donors remains unresolved. Hemophiliacs, at risk for B19 through their chronic exposure to clotting factor concentrates, have frequent, close medical follow‐up and thereby constitute an ideal group in which to study the hematologic sequelae of B19 infection. Study Design and Methods: An enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect B19 IgG and IgM and the polymerase chain reaction was used to detect B19 DNA in frozen, stored plasma samples, obtained between 1987 and 1994, from 136 subjects with hemophilia, including 71 who were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)‐positive and 65 who were HIV‐ negative. Then the results of the tests were compared with clinical hematological data and blood product usage data. Results: B19 seroprevalence in the hemophilic cohort was 81.6 percent (111/136), including 74.6 percent (53/71) of HIV‐positive and 89.2 percent (58/65) of HIV‐negative hemophiliacs. It was not affected by age, type or severity of hemophilia, HIV status, CD4 number, or yearly blood product usage. Only 1 (0.7%) of the 136 samples was positive for B19 IgM and none was positive in polymerase chain reaction for B19 DNA. After adjusting for HIV status, there were no differences between B19‐ positive and B19‐negative hemophiliacs in hematologic values, CD4 counts, or blood product use. Conclusion: Although B19 IgG seroprevalence in this hemophilic cohort is high and indicative of past B19 infection, there is no detectable B19 viral activity or any associated long‐term clinical or hematologic sequelae.

Journal

TransfusionWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1996

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off