Parvovirus B19 DNA in Factor VIII concentrates: effects of manufacturing procedures and B19 screening by nucleic acid testing

Parvovirus B19 DNA in Factor VIII concentrates: effects of manufacturing procedures and B19... BACKGROUND: Parvovirus B19 (B19) is a common contaminant, especially in coagulation factors. Because of B19 transmission by pooled plasma, solvent/detergent treated in 1999, some fractionators initiated minipool nucleic acid testing (NAT) to limit the B19 load in manufacturing pools. In this study, the extent of B19 DNA contamination in commercial Factor VIII concentrates, that is, antihemophilic factor (human) (AHF), manufactured before and after B19 NAT screening was implemented, was determined. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 284 lots representing six AHF products made during 1993 to 1998 and 2001 to 2004 were assayed for B19 DNA by an in‐house NAT procedure. Anti‐B19 immunoglobulin G (IgG) was also measured. RESULTS: Most lots made during 1993 to 1998 had detectable B19 DNA. The prevalence ranged from 56 to 100 percent and appeared to differ between manufacturers. The highest level of B19 DNA found was 106 genome equivalents (geq or international units (IU)) per mL. Forty percent of the lots tested contained 103 geq (IU) per mL. In comparison, both prevalence and levels in source plasma–derived AHF products made in 2001 to 2004 were lower. Both, however, remained unchanged in the recovered plasma‐derived product because B19 NAT screening had not been implemented. Only an intermediate‐purity AHF product was positive for the presence of anti‐B19 IgG. CONCLUSION: The prevalence and levels of B19 DNA in AHF prepared from B19 NAT unscreened plasma were high but varied among products with different manufacturing procedures. B19 NAT screening of plasma effectively lowered the B19 DNA level in the final products and in the majority of cases rendered it undetectable and hence potentially reduced the risk of B19 transmission. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transfusion Wiley

Parvovirus B19 DNA in Factor VIII concentrates: effects of manufacturing procedures and B19 screening by nucleic acid testing

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0041-1132
eISSN
1537-2995
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1537-2995.2007.01205.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Parvovirus B19 (B19) is a common contaminant, especially in coagulation factors. Because of B19 transmission by pooled plasma, solvent/detergent treated in 1999, some fractionators initiated minipool nucleic acid testing (NAT) to limit the B19 load in manufacturing pools. In this study, the extent of B19 DNA contamination in commercial Factor VIII concentrates, that is, antihemophilic factor (human) (AHF), manufactured before and after B19 NAT screening was implemented, was determined. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 284 lots representing six AHF products made during 1993 to 1998 and 2001 to 2004 were assayed for B19 DNA by an in‐house NAT procedure. Anti‐B19 immunoglobulin G (IgG) was also measured. RESULTS: Most lots made during 1993 to 1998 had detectable B19 DNA. The prevalence ranged from 56 to 100 percent and appeared to differ between manufacturers. The highest level of B19 DNA found was 106 genome equivalents (geq or international units (IU)) per mL. Forty percent of the lots tested contained 103 geq (IU) per mL. In comparison, both prevalence and levels in source plasma–derived AHF products made in 2001 to 2004 were lower. Both, however, remained unchanged in the recovered plasma‐derived product because B19 NAT screening had not been implemented. Only an intermediate‐purity AHF product was positive for the presence of anti‐B19 IgG. CONCLUSION: The prevalence and levels of B19 DNA in AHF prepared from B19 NAT unscreened plasma were high but varied among products with different manufacturing procedures. B19 NAT screening of plasma effectively lowered the B19 DNA level in the final products and in the majority of cases rendered it undetectable and hence potentially reduced the risk of B19 transmission.

Journal

TransfusionWiley

Published: May 1, 2007

References

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