Parentage complexity in socially monogamous lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer): Integrating genetic and observational data

Parentage complexity in socially monogamous lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer): Integrating genetic and... INTRODUCTIONThe term “social monogamy” has been used to describe social groups comprising one adult female, one adult male, and their nonbreeding offspring (Lukas & Clutton‐Brock, ). It occurs rarely among mammals (9% of species), but is relatively common among primates (29% of species) (Lukas & Clutton‐Brock, ). Given its prevalence in the latter group, including some human populations (Low, ; Scelza, ), there has been a large amount of research aimed at understanding the evolution of this social organization (e.g., Fernandez‐Duque, ; Fuentes, ; Opie, Atkinson, Dunbar, & Shultz, ; Tecot, Singletary, & Eadie, ). Importantly, however, socially monogamous groups may or may not represent strict nuclear families (single pair parents and their offspring), and this has implications for evolutionary and behavioral studies (Palombit, ; Tecot et al., ).Differences between inferred nuclear family relationships and actual relatedness of group members is often described as a distinction between social monogamy and “genetic monogamy” (Huck, Fernandez‐Duque, Babb, & Schurr, ; Lukas & Clutton‐Brock, ; Ophir, Phelps, Sorin, & Wolff, ). The latter refers to adult pairs that exhibit exclusive parentage of the offspring (Goossens et al., ; Ophir et al., ). Lack of concordance between these two aspects of sociality is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Primatology Wiley

Parentage complexity in socially monogamous lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer): Integrating genetic and observational data

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0275-2565
eISSN
1098-2345
D.O.I.
10.1002/ajp.22738
Publisher site
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Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe term “social monogamy” has been used to describe social groups comprising one adult female, one adult male, and their nonbreeding offspring (Lukas & Clutton‐Brock, ). It occurs rarely among mammals (9% of species), but is relatively common among primates (29% of species) (Lukas & Clutton‐Brock, ). Given its prevalence in the latter group, including some human populations (Low, ; Scelza, ), there has been a large amount of research aimed at understanding the evolution of this social organization (e.g., Fernandez‐Duque, ; Fuentes, ; Opie, Atkinson, Dunbar, & Shultz, ; Tecot, Singletary, & Eadie, ). Importantly, however, socially monogamous groups may or may not represent strict nuclear families (single pair parents and their offspring), and this has implications for evolutionary and behavioral studies (Palombit, ; Tecot et al., ).Differences between inferred nuclear family relationships and actual relatedness of group members is often described as a distinction between social monogamy and “genetic monogamy” (Huck, Fernandez‐Duque, Babb, & Schurr, ; Lukas & Clutton‐Brock, ; Ophir, Phelps, Sorin, & Wolff, ). The latter refers to adult pairs that exhibit exclusive parentage of the offspring (Goossens et al., ; Ophir et al., ). Lack of concordance between these two aspects of sociality is

Journal

American Journal of PrimatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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