Panbiogeography of Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae): analysis of the main species massings

Panbiogeography of Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae): analysis of the main species massings Aim The aim of this paper is to analyse the biogeography of Nothofagus and its subgenera in the light of molecular phylogenies and revisions of fossil taxa. Location Cooler parts of the South Pacific: Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, montane New Guinea and New Caledonia, and southern South America. Methods Panbiogeographical analysis is used. This involves comparative study of the geographic distributions of the Nothofagus taxa and other organisms in the region, and correlation of the main patterns with historical geology. Results The four subgenera of Nothofagus have their main massings of extant species in the same localities as the main massings of all (fossil plus extant) species. These main massings are vicariant, with subgen. Lophozonia most diverse in southern South America (north of Chiloé I.), subgen. Fuscospora in New Zealand, subgen. Nothofagus in southern South America (south of Valdivia), and subgen. Brassospora in New Guinea and New Caledonia. The main massings of subgen. Brassospora and of the clade subgen. Brassospora/subgen. Nothofagus (New Guinea–New Caledonia–southern South America) conform to standard biogeographical patterns. Main conclusions The vicariant main massings of the four subgenera are compatible with largely allopatric differentiation and no substantial dispersal since at least the Upper Cretaceous (Upper Campanian), by which time the fossil record shows that the four subgenera had evolved. The New Guinea–New Caledonia distribution of subgenus Brassospora is equivalent to its total main massing through geological time and is explained by different respective relationships of different component terranes of the two countries. Global vicariance at family level suggests that Nothofagaceae/Nothofagus evolved largely as the South Pacific/Antarctic vicariant in the breakup of a world‐wide Fagales ancestor. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Biogeography Wiley

Panbiogeography of Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae): analysis of the main species massings

Journal of Biogeography, Volume 33 (6) – Jun 1, 2006

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0305-0270
eISSN
1365-2699
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2699.2006.01479.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aim The aim of this paper is to analyse the biogeography of Nothofagus and its subgenera in the light of molecular phylogenies and revisions of fossil taxa. Location Cooler parts of the South Pacific: Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, montane New Guinea and New Caledonia, and southern South America. Methods Panbiogeographical analysis is used. This involves comparative study of the geographic distributions of the Nothofagus taxa and other organisms in the region, and correlation of the main patterns with historical geology. Results The four subgenera of Nothofagus have their main massings of extant species in the same localities as the main massings of all (fossil plus extant) species. These main massings are vicariant, with subgen. Lophozonia most diverse in southern South America (north of Chiloé I.), subgen. Fuscospora in New Zealand, subgen. Nothofagus in southern South America (south of Valdivia), and subgen. Brassospora in New Guinea and New Caledonia. The main massings of subgen. Brassospora and of the clade subgen. Brassospora/subgen. Nothofagus (New Guinea–New Caledonia–southern South America) conform to standard biogeographical patterns. Main conclusions The vicariant main massings of the four subgenera are compatible with largely allopatric differentiation and no substantial dispersal since at least the Upper Cretaceous (Upper Campanian), by which time the fossil record shows that the four subgenera had evolved. The New Guinea–New Caledonia distribution of subgenus Brassospora is equivalent to its total main massing through geological time and is explained by different respective relationships of different component terranes of the two countries. Global vicariance at family level suggests that Nothofagaceae/Nothofagus evolved largely as the South Pacific/Antarctic vicariant in the breakup of a world‐wide Fagales ancestor.

Journal

Journal of BiogeographyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2006

References

  • Regional implications of U/Pb SHRIMP age constraints on the tectonic evolution of New Caledonia
    Aitchison, Aitchison; Ireland, Ireland; Clarke, Clarke; Cluzel, Cluzel; Davis, Davis; Meffre, Meffre
  • Nepenthaceae
    Cheek, Cheek; Jebb, Jebb
  • Birds of paradise, biogeography and ecology in New Guinea: a review
    Heads, Heads
  • Dating nodes on molecular phylogenies: a critique of molecular biogeography
    Heads, Heads
  • Tertiary Nothofagus (Fagaceae) macrofossils from Tasmania and Antarctica and their bearing on the evolution of the genus
    Hill, Hill
  • Nothofagus and Pacific biogeography
    Linder, Linder; Crisp, Crisp
  • Relationships among Tasmanian Tertiary Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae) populations
    Scriven, Scriven; Hill, Hill
  • Nothofagus biogeography revisited with special emphasis on the enigmatic distribution of subgenus Brassospora in New Caledonia
    Swenson, Swenson; Backlund, Backlund; McLoughlin, McLoughlin; Hill, Hill

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