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Palestinian Girls and the Multiple Meanings of Hijab

Palestinian Girls and the Multiple Meanings of Hijab INTRODUCTION From flappers to hippies in the twentieth century, to tattoos and piercings in the twenty‐first, adolescent use of dress and the body to express their hopes for freedom and change are not new. Narcissistic pre‐occupation with the changing adolescent body and its adornment is widely seen as a part of normative development (Springer, ). In addition, adolescent dress that conforms to specific counter‐culture codes is often an expression of identity development (Nilan, ; Brandt, ; Forney and Rabolt, ). Springer ( ) also points out that these preoccupations of adolescence are often front and center in the face of violence. Using this theoretical backdrop, the use of hijab , and other “traditional” forms of body covering amongst adolescent girls in the Occupied Palestinian Territories are explored, with an emphasis on the nature and variety of meanings that the popular dress may hold amongst girls in Gaza under siege. The authors do not see the phenomenon as either monolithically political or religious. Instead the authors will examine the ways in which, on the one hand, internal forces are individually elaborated and externalized in dress, and on the other hand, how dress may serve as a protective shield against http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

Palestinian Girls and the Multiple Meanings of Hijab

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.1326
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION From flappers to hippies in the twentieth century, to tattoos and piercings in the twenty‐first, adolescent use of dress and the body to express their hopes for freedom and change are not new. Narcissistic pre‐occupation with the changing adolescent body and its adornment is widely seen as a part of normative development (Springer, ). In addition, adolescent dress that conforms to specific counter‐culture codes is often an expression of identity development (Nilan, ; Brandt, ; Forney and Rabolt, ). Springer ( ) also points out that these preoccupations of adolescence are often front and center in the face of violence. Using this theoretical backdrop, the use of hijab , and other “traditional” forms of body covering amongst adolescent girls in the Occupied Palestinian Territories are explored, with an emphasis on the nature and variety of meanings that the popular dress may hold amongst girls in Gaza under siege. The authors do not see the phenomenon as either monolithically political or religious. Instead the authors will examine the ways in which, on the one hand, internal forces are individually elaborated and externalized in dress, and on the other hand, how dress may serve as a protective shield against

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2012

References