Pain Management in Elderly People

Pain Management in Elderly People Patient comfort and the control of pain are important goals in geriatric care. Pain is the most common symptom of disease and the most common complaint in physicians’ offices. 1 However, the management of chronic pain can be perplexing for physicians. With no objective biological markers for pain, assessment remains based on the patient's perceptions and self‐report, and these are often clouded by individual interpretation of sensation, affective reactions, and behavioral responses. Several studies have documented that many physicians and nurses lack information about pain assessment and may have an inaccurate knowledge base about common pharmacological agents used in pain control. 2–4 Consequences of pain are widespread in the elderly population. Depression, 5–7 decreased socialization, 7–8 sleep disturbance, 7 impaired ambulation, 7–9 and increased health care utilization and costs 9 have all been associated with the presence of pain among elderly people. Though less thoroughly explored, deconditioning, gait disturbances, falls, slow rehabilitation, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and malnutrition are among the many geriatric conditions potentially worsened by the presence of pain. Finally, pain and its management have major implications for quality of life and quality of care, especially for terminal patients 10 and residents of long‐term‐care facilities. 8 Pain http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Geriatrics Society Wiley

Pain Management in Elderly People

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/pain-management-in-elderly-people-hBqqBhpotn
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1991 The American Geriatrics Society
ISSN
0002-8614
eISSN
1532-5415
DOI
10.1111/j.1532-5415.1991.tb05908.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Patient comfort and the control of pain are important goals in geriatric care. Pain is the most common symptom of disease and the most common complaint in physicians’ offices. 1 However, the management of chronic pain can be perplexing for physicians. With no objective biological markers for pain, assessment remains based on the patient's perceptions and self‐report, and these are often clouded by individual interpretation of sensation, affective reactions, and behavioral responses. Several studies have documented that many physicians and nurses lack information about pain assessment and may have an inaccurate knowledge base about common pharmacological agents used in pain control. 2–4 Consequences of pain are widespread in the elderly population. Depression, 5–7 decreased socialization, 7–8 sleep disturbance, 7 impaired ambulation, 7–9 and increased health care utilization and costs 9 have all been associated with the presence of pain among elderly people. Though less thoroughly explored, deconditioning, gait disturbances, falls, slow rehabilitation, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and malnutrition are among the many geriatric conditions potentially worsened by the presence of pain. Finally, pain and its management have major implications for quality of life and quality of care, especially for terminal patients 10 and residents of long‐term‐care facilities. 8 Pain

Journal

Journal of American Geriatrics SocietyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1991

References

  • Quality of life as an outcome variable in management of cancer pain
    Ferrell, Ferrell; Wisdom, Wisdom; Wenzel, Wenzel
  • Epidemiology of Osteoarthritis
    Davis, Davis
  • The Treatment of Cancer Pain
    Foley, Foley
  • Pain in the Elderly
    Gordon, Gordon
  • Changing presentations of myocardial infarctions with increasing old age
    Bayer, Bayer; Chada, Chada; Farag, Farag
  • Intraabdominal infections in the elderly
    Norman, Norman; Yoshikawa, Yoshikawa
  • Performance oriented assessment of mobility problems in elderly patients
    Tinetti, Tinetti
  • A validation study of the WHO method for cancer pain relief
    Ventafridda, Ventafridda; Tamburini, Tamburini; Caraceni, Caraceni

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off