Pain begets pain. When marathon runners are not in pain anymore, they underestimate their memory of marathon pain––A mediation analysis

Pain begets pain. When marathon runners are not in pain anymore, they underestimate their memory... IntroductionThe memory of pain is consistently regarded as an important topic for research (Erskine et al., ; Niven and Murphy‐Black, ; von Baeyer et al., ; Noel et al., ). Although several studies have shown that pain may be remembered accurately (Lefebvre and Keefe, ; Bąbel, , , ; Hovasapian and Levine, ), there is also evidence indicating that people tend to overestimate (Gedney and Logan, , ; Broderick et al., ; McNeil et al., ) or underestimate it (Fors and Götestam, ; Eli et al., ; Rode et al., ; De Pascalis et al., ; Bąbel, ). Such inconsistency in the research findings inspires the search for the factors influencing the accuracy of remembering pain.It seems that the type and the meaning of pain experience may influence memory processes (Bąbel et al., ). Suffering in a situation that is perceived as positive and desirable may be remembered differently than pain associated with traumatic and poorly controllable events such as illness, injury or surgery. The research on memory of labour pain indicates that, in line with the intuitive assumptions, pain associated with positively valued experiences is underestimated rather than overestimated (Bennett, ; Lowe and Roberts, ; Norvell et al., ; Simkin, ; Waldenström, ; Waldenström and Schytt, ; for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Pain Wiley

Pain begets pain. When marathon runners are not in pain anymore, they underestimate their memory of marathon pain––A mediation analysis

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 European Pain Federation ‐ EFIC®
ISSN
1090-3801
eISSN
1532-2149
D.O.I.
10.1002/ejp.1166
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionThe memory of pain is consistently regarded as an important topic for research (Erskine et al., ; Niven and Murphy‐Black, ; von Baeyer et al., ; Noel et al., ). Although several studies have shown that pain may be remembered accurately (Lefebvre and Keefe, ; Bąbel, , , ; Hovasapian and Levine, ), there is also evidence indicating that people tend to overestimate (Gedney and Logan, , ; Broderick et al., ; McNeil et al., ) or underestimate it (Fors and Götestam, ; Eli et al., ; Rode et al., ; De Pascalis et al., ; Bąbel, ). Such inconsistency in the research findings inspires the search for the factors influencing the accuracy of remembering pain.It seems that the type and the meaning of pain experience may influence memory processes (Bąbel et al., ). Suffering in a situation that is perceived as positive and desirable may be remembered differently than pain associated with traumatic and poorly controllable events such as illness, injury or surgery. The research on memory of labour pain indicates that, in line with the intuitive assumptions, pain associated with positively valued experiences is underestimated rather than overestimated (Bennett, ; Lowe and Roberts, ; Norvell et al., ; Simkin, ; Waldenström, ; Waldenström and Schytt, ; for

Journal

European Journal of PainWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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