Output Strategies for English‐Language Learners: Theory to Practice

Output Strategies for English‐Language Learners: Theory to Practice Language production, or output, is not simply a product to demonstrate learning but part of the learning process. The output hypothesis, a theoretical model of second‐language acquisition, proposes that second‐language learners must produce the language they are learning in order to obtain a level of proficiency similar to that of native speakers. The purpose of this article is to apply the principles of the output hypothesis to language and literacy instruction for English‐language learners (ELLs). A brief review of literature related to the input and output hypotheses is presented and is followed by application of the output theory to several common classroom practices. Emphasis is placed on the importance of moving beyond providing input for ELLs and intentionally targeting children's language production. Hypothetical examples of teacher talk and teaching strategies that encourage output are provided. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Reading Teacher Wiley

Output Strategies for English‐Language Learners: Theory to Practice

The Reading Teacher, Volume 61 (6) – Mar 1, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/output-strategies-for-english-language-learners-theory-to-practice-sIZiiL0ijj
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2008 International Reading Association
ISSN
0034-0561
eISSN
1936-2714
D.O.I.
10.1598/RT.61.6.4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Language production, or output, is not simply a product to demonstrate learning but part of the learning process. The output hypothesis, a theoretical model of second‐language acquisition, proposes that second‐language learners must produce the language they are learning in order to obtain a level of proficiency similar to that of native speakers. The purpose of this article is to apply the principles of the output hypothesis to language and literacy instruction for English‐language learners (ELLs). A brief review of literature related to the input and output hypotheses is presented and is followed by application of the output theory to several common classroom practices. Emphasis is placed on the importance of moving beyond providing input for ELLs and intentionally targeting children's language production. Hypothetical examples of teacher talk and teaching strategies that encourage output are provided.

Journal

The Reading TeacherWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2008

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off