Out‐of‐Sequence Thrusts

Out‐of‐Sequence Thrusts Out‐of‐sequence thrusts (OOST) are those thrusts which do not obey the foreland propagating or in‐sequence deformation style. They include both isolated thrusts which develop hindward of the thrust front and sequences of break‐back thrusts which propagate from the foreland to the hinterland. Two end‐members of a series of OOST types are recognized: (1) older in‐sequence thrusts which are reactivated along their entire length and (2) completely new thrusts which propagate through already deformed thrust sheets. Between the two end‐members are thrusts composed partially of reactivated in‐sequence thrust sequences and partially of new, entirely out‐of‐sequence segments. OOSTs can be initiated for a variety of reasons including: (1) keeping the orogenic wedge at critical taper, (2) break‐back sequences from the suture zone in the overriding plate, (3) ramping to overcome a sticking point which inhibits in‐sequence thrust propagation, and (4) during simultaneous displacement along two stacked thrusts culminations which bow up segment of the upper thrust may be chopped through to permit continued displacement on the upper thrust. Many different types of thrust behavior including gravity sliding, plucking, and derivation of isolated horses from ramps may mimic some of the characteristics of OOSTs. Consequently, it may be difficult to conclusively prove an OOST origin for a complex thrust geometry. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tectonics Wiley

Out‐of‐Sequence Thrusts

Tectonics, Volume 7 (3) – Jun 1, 1988

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0278-7407
eISSN
1944-9194
DOI
10.1029/TC007i003p00539
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Out‐of‐sequence thrusts (OOST) are those thrusts which do not obey the foreland propagating or in‐sequence deformation style. They include both isolated thrusts which develop hindward of the thrust front and sequences of break‐back thrusts which propagate from the foreland to the hinterland. Two end‐members of a series of OOST types are recognized: (1) older in‐sequence thrusts which are reactivated along their entire length and (2) completely new thrusts which propagate through already deformed thrust sheets. Between the two end‐members are thrusts composed partially of reactivated in‐sequence thrust sequences and partially of new, entirely out‐of‐sequence segments. OOSTs can be initiated for a variety of reasons including: (1) keeping the orogenic wedge at critical taper, (2) break‐back sequences from the suture zone in the overriding plate, (3) ramping to overcome a sticking point which inhibits in‐sequence thrust propagation, and (4) during simultaneous displacement along two stacked thrusts culminations which bow up segment of the upper thrust may be chopped through to permit continued displacement on the upper thrust. Many different types of thrust behavior including gravity sliding, plucking, and derivation of isolated horses from ramps may mimic some of the characteristics of OOSTs. Consequently, it may be difficult to conclusively prove an OOST origin for a complex thrust geometry.

Journal

TectonicsWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1988

References

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