Orangutan Rehabilitation in Tanjung Puting National Park, Indonesia

Orangutan Rehabilitation in Tanjung Puting National Park, Indonesia Rehabilitation of endangered species is one of the central problems in conservation biology (Barclay & Cade 1983; Kleiman et al. 1986). Rehabilitation involves providing former captive individuals the experiences or training necessary to survive and reproduce successfully in the wild. Rehabilitated individuals are then released into appropriate habitat. The advantages of rehabilitation as a captive management tool include (1) providing demographic and genetic reservoirs from which new populations may be founded or genetic diversity can be increased and (2) reducing the threat of extinction of species in the wild, for example, Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) (Stanley Price 1989), Mauritius Kestrels (Falco punctatus) (Cade & Jones 1993), and Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) (Barclay & Cade 1983). Individuals from these species have, upon release, engaged in species-appropriate behaviors and successfully reproduced and reared offspring. Rehabilitation programs involving non-human primates have met with mixed success. Golden-lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia) in Brazil are probably the best example of moderate success. Some tamarins have been successfully rehabilitated; however, even this project has had over 50% mortality and has cost hundreds of thousands of dollars (Kleiman et al. 1986). Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at Rubondo Island are doing quite well; they are completely independent of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Orangutan Rehabilitation in Tanjung Puting National Park, Indonesia

Conservation Biology, Volume 11 (3) – Jun 9, 1997

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Society for Conservation Biology
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1997.95500.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rehabilitation of endangered species is one of the central problems in conservation biology (Barclay & Cade 1983; Kleiman et al. 1986). Rehabilitation involves providing former captive individuals the experiences or training necessary to survive and reproduce successfully in the wild. Rehabilitated individuals are then released into appropriate habitat. The advantages of rehabilitation as a captive management tool include (1) providing demographic and genetic reservoirs from which new populations may be founded or genetic diversity can be increased and (2) reducing the threat of extinction of species in the wild, for example, Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) (Stanley Price 1989), Mauritius Kestrels (Falco punctatus) (Cade & Jones 1993), and Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) (Barclay & Cade 1983). Individuals from these species have, upon release, engaged in species-appropriate behaviors and successfully reproduced and reared offspring. Rehabilitation programs involving non-human primates have met with mixed success. Golden-lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia) in Brazil are probably the best example of moderate success. Some tamarins have been successfully rehabilitated; however, even this project has had over 50% mortality and has cost hundreds of thousands of dollars (Kleiman et al. 1986). Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at Rubondo Island are doing quite well; they are completely independent of

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Jun 9, 1997

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