Optimal diet breadth theory as a model to explain variability in Amazonian hunting

Optimal diet breadth theory as a model to explain variability in Amazonian hunting Optimal foraging theory is a set of related models from evolutionary ecology that predict the range and proportions of food items a predator should consume (diet breadth), where and how long it should hunt (patch choice), and how it should move (path choice). This paper assesses the utility of such models in anthropology by applying an optimal diet breadth approach to the analysis of hunting yields in three Amazonian societies. Specifically, we analyze diet breadth as a function of settlement age, distance, and technology. Data from the Siona‐Secoya, Ye'kwana, and Yanomamö indicate that these factors have a significant influence on diet breadth and support the basic predictions of the optimization model. (ecological anthropology, foraging strategies, Amazonia, South American Indians, anthropological theory) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Ethnologist Wiley

Optimal diet breadth theory as a model to explain variability in Amazonian hunting

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1982 American Anthropological Association
ISSN
0094-0496
eISSN
1548-1425
DOI
10.1525/ae.1982.9.2.02a00090
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Optimal foraging theory is a set of related models from evolutionary ecology that predict the range and proportions of food items a predator should consume (diet breadth), where and how long it should hunt (patch choice), and how it should move (path choice). This paper assesses the utility of such models in anthropology by applying an optimal diet breadth approach to the analysis of hunting yields in three Amazonian societies. Specifically, we analyze diet breadth as a function of settlement age, distance, and technology. Data from the Siona‐Secoya, Ye'kwana, and Yanomamö indicate that these factors have a significant influence on diet breadth and support the basic predictions of the optimization model. (ecological anthropology, foraging strategies, Amazonia, South American Indians, anthropological theory)

Journal

American EthnologistWiley

Published: May 1, 1982

References

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