Operant self‐administration of pregabalin in a mouse model of neuropathic pain

Operant self‐administration of pregabalin in a mouse model of neuropathic pain IntroductionPregabalin is an antiepileptic drug prescribed as first‐line treatment for chronic neuropathic pain (Finnerup et al., ) mainly acting on the α2δ‐1 calcium channel subunit, which is critical for functional expression of voltage‐gated calcium channels (Field et al., ; Patel and Dickenson, ). Multiple preclinical studies have shown the efficacy of pregabalin alleviating hypernociception associated with neuropathic injuries (Field et al., , ; Nozaki‐Taguchi et al., ; Kremer et al., ). While some of these studies describe complete reversion of neuropathic hypersensitivity, it should be noted that the number of patients needed to treat for 50% pain relief (i.e. patients who need to be treated to obtain one with a 50% of pain relief) is estimated between 6.5 and 9.4 (Finnerup et al., ). This discordance between clinical data and preclinical studies may be related to the measurement of evoked sensitivity in the current preclinical studies. While one of the most prevalent symptoms in chronic neuropathic syndromes is spontaneous pain (96% of the cases (Backonja and Stacey, )), studies estimating the efficacy of pregabalin alleviating spontaneous manifestations of neuropathic pain models in mice are lacking.Different clinical studies (Papazisis and Tzachanis, ; Bossard et al., ; Schjerning et al., ; Evoy et al., ) and individual reports (Filipetto et al., http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Pain Wiley

Operant self‐administration of pregabalin in a mouse model of neuropathic pain

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 European Pain Federation ‐ EFIC®
ISSN
1090-3801
eISSN
1532-2149
D.O.I.
10.1002/ejp.1161
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionPregabalin is an antiepileptic drug prescribed as first‐line treatment for chronic neuropathic pain (Finnerup et al., ) mainly acting on the α2δ‐1 calcium channel subunit, which is critical for functional expression of voltage‐gated calcium channels (Field et al., ; Patel and Dickenson, ). Multiple preclinical studies have shown the efficacy of pregabalin alleviating hypernociception associated with neuropathic injuries (Field et al., , ; Nozaki‐Taguchi et al., ; Kremer et al., ). While some of these studies describe complete reversion of neuropathic hypersensitivity, it should be noted that the number of patients needed to treat for 50% pain relief (i.e. patients who need to be treated to obtain one with a 50% of pain relief) is estimated between 6.5 and 9.4 (Finnerup et al., ). This discordance between clinical data and preclinical studies may be related to the measurement of evoked sensitivity in the current preclinical studies. While one of the most prevalent symptoms in chronic neuropathic syndromes is spontaneous pain (96% of the cases (Backonja and Stacey, )), studies estimating the efficacy of pregabalin alleviating spontaneous manifestations of neuropathic pain models in mice are lacking.Different clinical studies (Papazisis and Tzachanis, ; Bossard et al., ; Schjerning et al., ; Evoy et al., ) and individual reports (Filipetto et al.,

Journal

European Journal of PainWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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