On the use of three performance measures for fitting species response curves

On the use of three performance measures for fitting species response curves Abstract. Quantitative response surfaces obtained from three performance measures, density, cover and volume, are compared, using as an example the spatial distribution of Periploca angustifolia (Asclepiadaceae) in SE Spain. Generalized linear models are used to examine relationships between these species performance measures and complex gradients of aspect, slope angle and altitude. All three performance measures showed a skewed response to the environmental gradients, unlike the Gaussian responses commonly assumed in vegetation theory; skewness increased as the number of dimensions of the performance measures increased. Certain asymmetries between the responses are discussed in terms of competition, and problems related to the use of complex gradients are considered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/on-the-use-of-three-performance-measures-for-fitting-species-response-T99rhueXl2
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1995 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
DOI
10.2307/3236256
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Quantitative response surfaces obtained from three performance measures, density, cover and volume, are compared, using as an example the spatial distribution of Periploca angustifolia (Asclepiadaceae) in SE Spain. Generalized linear models are used to examine relationships between these species performance measures and complex gradients of aspect, slope angle and altitude. All three performance measures showed a skewed response to the environmental gradients, unlike the Gaussian responses commonly assumed in vegetation theory; skewness increased as the number of dimensions of the performance measures increased. Certain asymmetries between the responses are discussed in terms of competition, and problems related to the use of complex gradients are considered.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1995

References

  • Continuum concept, ordination methods, and niche concept
    Austin, Austin
  • Current problems of environmental gradients and species response curves in relation to continuum theory
    Austin, Austin; Gaywood, Gaywood
  • Gradient analysis of vegetation
    Whittaker, Whittaker

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off