ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF UNGLACIATED AREAS DURING THE ICE AGES AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE TO PHYTOGEOGRAPHY

ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF UNGLACIATED AREAS DURING THE ICE AGES AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE TO PHYTOGEOGRAPHY L THE THEORY OF UNGLACIATED AREAS DURING THE LAST ICE AGE IN SCANDINAVIA Our knowledge of the existence of Ice Ages in the Northern Hemisphere is not very old. It dates from about the middle of the nineteenth century. Scientists in various parts of Europe found that the extensive masses of unsorted loose deposits, and the striated and polished rocks could not be explained in any other way than by assuming that a large ice sheet had existed which overrode the country, polishing the rocks and depositing moraine gravel. The signs of glaciation are so abundantly present in almost all parts of Scandinavia that it very soon led to the supposition that the ice mass had covered the whole country and destroyed all plant and animal life. This was the 'tabula rasa' theory. As a consequence of the theory the present flora and fauna of Scandinavia were held to have immigrated after the Ice Age from the south and east. Further indication of this was found in 1870 by Nathorst who succeeded in discovering remnants of an arctic flora in southern Sweden in layers deposited just after the ice had retreated. Later many scientists found similar remnants in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Phytologist Wiley

ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF UNGLACIATED AREAS DURING THE ICE AGES AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE TO PHYTOGEOGRAPHY

New Phytologist, Volume 45 (2) – Dec 1, 1946

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1946 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0028-646X
eISSN
1469-8137
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1469-8137.1946.tb05058.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

L THE THEORY OF UNGLACIATED AREAS DURING THE LAST ICE AGE IN SCANDINAVIA Our knowledge of the existence of Ice Ages in the Northern Hemisphere is not very old. It dates from about the middle of the nineteenth century. Scientists in various parts of Europe found that the extensive masses of unsorted loose deposits, and the striated and polished rocks could not be explained in any other way than by assuming that a large ice sheet had existed which overrode the country, polishing the rocks and depositing moraine gravel. The signs of glaciation are so abundantly present in almost all parts of Scandinavia that it very soon led to the supposition that the ice mass had covered the whole country and destroyed all plant and animal life. This was the 'tabula rasa' theory. As a consequence of the theory the present flora and fauna of Scandinavia were held to have immigrated after the Ice Age from the south and east. Further indication of this was found in 1870 by Nathorst who succeeded in discovering remnants of an arctic flora in southern Sweden in layers deposited just after the ice had retreated. Later many scientists found similar remnants in

Journal

New PhytologistWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1946

References

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