Old‐growth forests buffer climate‐sensitive bird populations from warming

Old‐growth forests buffer climate‐sensitive bird populations from warming INTRODUCTIONProjections of biodiversity in a changing climate suggest widespread declines and distributional shifts as the rate of warming overtakes species’ capacity to adapt (Huey & Tewksbury, ; Pecl et al., ; Thomas et al., ). Empirical data support the general observation that distributions and abundance of many species are not keeping pace with climate change (Chen, Hill, Ohlemuller, Roy, & Thomas, ; Van Mantgem et al., ). However, climate responses are highly variable across species and systems; empirical validations of climate–biodiversity projections reveal important gaps between predicted and observed population changes (Gutiérrez‐Illán et al., ; Tingley, Koo, Moritz, Rush, & Beissinger, ) that are not necessarily well explained by variation in life history traits (Wogan, ). One possible reason for this mismatch is that the spatial resolution of climate data rarely matches the scales of habitat use experienced by organisms (Frey, Hadley, Johnson, et al., ; Hannah et al., ); most projections neglect to consider the local‐ and landscape‐scale vegetation conditions experienced by species (Sirami et al., ). Indeed, most climate data are collected at spatial scales 103 times greater than focal species territories (Potter, Arthur Woods, & Pincebourde, ). However, organisms may be able to buffer themselves from stressful environmental conditions by selecting particular vegetation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diversity and Distributions Wiley

Old‐growth forests buffer climate‐sensitive bird populations from warming

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1366-9516
eISSN
1472-4642
D.O.I.
10.1111/ddi.12688
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONProjections of biodiversity in a changing climate suggest widespread declines and distributional shifts as the rate of warming overtakes species’ capacity to adapt (Huey & Tewksbury, ; Pecl et al., ; Thomas et al., ). Empirical data support the general observation that distributions and abundance of many species are not keeping pace with climate change (Chen, Hill, Ohlemuller, Roy, & Thomas, ; Van Mantgem et al., ). However, climate responses are highly variable across species and systems; empirical validations of climate–biodiversity projections reveal important gaps between predicted and observed population changes (Gutiérrez‐Illán et al., ; Tingley, Koo, Moritz, Rush, & Beissinger, ) that are not necessarily well explained by variation in life history traits (Wogan, ). One possible reason for this mismatch is that the spatial resolution of climate data rarely matches the scales of habitat use experienced by organisms (Frey, Hadley, Johnson, et al., ; Hannah et al., ); most projections neglect to consider the local‐ and landscape‐scale vegetation conditions experienced by species (Sirami et al., ). Indeed, most climate data are collected at spatial scales 103 times greater than focal species territories (Potter, Arthur Woods, & Pincebourde, ). However, organisms may be able to buffer themselves from stressful environmental conditions by selecting particular vegetation

Journal

Diversity and DistributionsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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