Observed parent–child feeding dynamics in relation to child body mass index and adiposity

Observed parent–child feeding dynamics in relation to child body mass index and adiposity IntroductionThere is much interest in identifying parental feeding practices that promote childhood obesity , as these may be targets for treatment or prevention. To date, most evidence points to restrictive feeding as a risk factor . Specifically, parents who are more restrictive of palatable (typically high fat, high sugar) foods tend to have children who are heavier . The direction of causality appears consistent with a bi‐directional model . Thus, parents likely respond to children's overweight by restricting food access, which in turn exacerbates weight gain. That said, some data appear to support a fully ‘child responsive’ model . Greater parental encouragement to eat also has been linked consistently to reduced child body mass index (BMI) .A major limitation of this literature is that most studies have used parent‐report questionnaires to assess feeding styles; relatively, few have used observational methods [see the review of Bergmeier et al. ], which arguably is a gold‐standard approach for capturing parent–child dynamics. In the child development field, researchers typically look to convergent findings among parent‐report and observational methods to examine the robustness of results . In one of the earliest studies of 14 children, ages 12–30 months , greater child weight status was significantly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Obesity Wiley

Observed parent–child feeding dynamics in relation to child body mass index and adiposity

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 World Obesity Federation
ISSN
2047-6302
eISSN
2047-6310
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijpo.12209
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionThere is much interest in identifying parental feeding practices that promote childhood obesity , as these may be targets for treatment or prevention. To date, most evidence points to restrictive feeding as a risk factor . Specifically, parents who are more restrictive of palatable (typically high fat, high sugar) foods tend to have children who are heavier . The direction of causality appears consistent with a bi‐directional model . Thus, parents likely respond to children's overweight by restricting food access, which in turn exacerbates weight gain. That said, some data appear to support a fully ‘child responsive’ model . Greater parental encouragement to eat also has been linked consistently to reduced child body mass index (BMI) .A major limitation of this literature is that most studies have used parent‐report questionnaires to assess feeding styles; relatively, few have used observational methods [see the review of Bergmeier et al. ], which arguably is a gold‐standard approach for capturing parent–child dynamics. In the child development field, researchers typically look to convergent findings among parent‐report and observational methods to examine the robustness of results . In one of the earliest studies of 14 children, ages 12–30 months , greater child weight status was significantly

Journal

Pediatric ObesityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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