Observation of pressure variations in the Martian atmosphere

Observation of pressure variations in the Martian atmosphere Pressure waves in the Martian atmosphere could so far be observed only in the presence of clouds. Thanks to the Mars Global Surveyor/Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MGS/MOLA), a direct observation is now possible, with the method presented here. Many more events are thus potentially observable. We compare altimetry measurements from MGS/MOLA and spectral observations from ISM, the infrared spectrometer aboard the Phobos‐2 spacecraft, to infer pressure variations in the Martian atmosphere. We identify variations of pressure above Martian volcanoes and we observe lee vortices of wavelength ∼200–250 km and amplitude ∼0.05 mbar in two different occasions. The application of this technique should constrain Martian meteorology with data from future imaging spectrometers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geophysical Research Letters Wiley

Observation of pressure variations in the Martian atmosphere

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0094-8276
eISSN
1944-8007
D.O.I.
10.1029/2003GL018234
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pressure waves in the Martian atmosphere could so far be observed only in the presence of clouds. Thanks to the Mars Global Surveyor/Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MGS/MOLA), a direct observation is now possible, with the method presented here. Many more events are thus potentially observable. We compare altimetry measurements from MGS/MOLA and spectral observations from ISM, the infrared spectrometer aboard the Phobos‐2 spacecraft, to infer pressure variations in the Martian atmosphere. We identify variations of pressure above Martian volcanoes and we observe lee vortices of wavelength ∼200–250 km and amplitude ∼0.05 mbar in two different occasions. The application of this technique should constrain Martian meteorology with data from future imaging spectrometers.

Journal

Geophysical Research LettersWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2003

References

  • Winter Clouds over the North Martian Polar Cap
    Pettengill, Pettengill; Ford, Ford

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