Null Models for Assessing Ecosystem Conservation Priorities: Threatened Birds as Titers of Threatened Ecosystems in South America

Null Models for Assessing Ecosystem Conservation Priorities: Threatened Birds as Titers of... We set ecosystem conservation priorities based on a comparison of observed levels of threat and protection versus expected levels derived from the use of null models. We used differences in the proportion of threatened and nonthreatened bird species among ecosystems to assess levels of threat and differences in the coverage of parks and protected areas relative to land area to assess levels of protection. We applied this approach to terrestrial biomes of continental South America and determined where recommendations for species and ecosystem conservation converge and diverge. We calculated the percentage of range in each biome for 132 bird species threatened by habitat destruction and 288 nonthreatened bird species. Three biomes (evergreen forest, broadleaf forest, and cold desert) were not included because few bird ranges fell primarily within them. Tropical humid forest and mountain biomes supported the greatest levels of avian species diversity. But only subtropical and temperate rainforests and tropical dry forests supported a higher proportion of threatened bird species than expected, making them ecosystem destruction hotspots. Tropical humid forests and tropical and temperate grasslands supported lesser proportions of threatened bird species than expected (i.e., coldspots), whereas mountain and warm deserts supported similar proportions of threatened and nonthreatened bird species (i.e., neutral). These patterns were corroborated by the apportionment of human population densities among biomes. Highest densities (> 25 per km2) occurred in subtropical and temperate rainforests and tropical dry forests, whereas tropical humid forests and warm deserts supported the lowest human densities (< 1 per km2). The largest proportions of protected areas were in tropical humid forest and mountain biomes, which is in accord with the distribution of avian diversity but not with our assessment of habitat destruction. Protected areas were especially underrepresented in tropical dry forests, making them the most threatened biome. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Null Models for Assessing Ecosystem Conservation Priorities: Threatened Birds as Titers of Threatened Ecosystems in South America

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/null-models-for-assessing-ecosystem-conservation-priorities-threatened-0KTOaDF0qo
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1996.10051343.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We set ecosystem conservation priorities based on a comparison of observed levels of threat and protection versus expected levels derived from the use of null models. We used differences in the proportion of threatened and nonthreatened bird species among ecosystems to assess levels of threat and differences in the coverage of parks and protected areas relative to land area to assess levels of protection. We applied this approach to terrestrial biomes of continental South America and determined where recommendations for species and ecosystem conservation converge and diverge. We calculated the percentage of range in each biome for 132 bird species threatened by habitat destruction and 288 nonthreatened bird species. Three biomes (evergreen forest, broadleaf forest, and cold desert) were not included because few bird ranges fell primarily within them. Tropical humid forest and mountain biomes supported the greatest levels of avian species diversity. But only subtropical and temperate rainforests and tropical dry forests supported a higher proportion of threatened bird species than expected, making them ecosystem destruction hotspots. Tropical humid forests and tropical and temperate grasslands supported lesser proportions of threatened bird species than expected (i.e., coldspots), whereas mountain and warm deserts supported similar proportions of threatened and nonthreatened bird species (i.e., neutral). These patterns were corroborated by the apportionment of human population densities among biomes. Highest densities (> 25 per km2) occurred in subtropical and temperate rainforests and tropical dry forests, whereas tropical humid forests and warm deserts supported the lowest human densities (< 1 per km2). The largest proportions of protected areas were in tropical humid forest and mountain biomes, which is in accord with the distribution of avian diversity but not with our assessment of habitat destruction. Protected areas were especially underrepresented in tropical dry forests, making them the most threatened biome.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1996

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off