Novel Use of Scanning Electron Microscopy for Detection of Iron‐Induced Morphological Changes in Human Blood

Novel Use of Scanning Electron Microscopy for Detection of Iron‐Induced Morphological Changes... ABSTRACT Fibrinogen is key to the maintenance of hemostasis and is an acute phase protein that is part of the coagulation cascade of proteins. It plays a fundamental role in inflammation, particularly as indicator for a proinflammatory state and is a prominent marker for developing vascular inflammatory diseases. The ultrastructure of fibrin nets can be studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with the addition of thrombin to plasma. In inflammatory conditions such as thromboembolic ischemic stroke and diabetes, the fibrin networks are changed to from dense matted fibrin deposits (DMDs) instead of typical netlike appearance. Similar DMDs can also be induced with the addition of FeCl2 and FeCl3. Importantly, the iron‐induced DMDs look similar to those from patients with prothrombotic conditions. Excessive or misplaced tissue iron now is recognized to pose a substantial health risk. The current research therefore investigates the establishment of a laboratory fibrinogen model to study that might mimic fibrin fiber generation that is achieved using plasma from healthy and diseased individuals. Furthermore, to determine whether the addition of iron to purified fibrinogen will show DMDs and whether hydrophilic agents can prevent them. We conclude that SEM is a very effective tool for the visualization of circulatory consequences of the interaction of iron‐induced hydroxyl radicals with human fibrinogen. Furthermore, this novel fibrinogen model provides a convenient method to study the interactions of the intramolecular and intermolecular hydrophobic forces responsible for the maintenance of the tertiary structure of native fibrin(ogen) and the prevention of iron‐induced DMDs formation by hydrophilic agents. Microsc. Res. Tech. 76:268–271, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Microscopy Research and Technique Wiley

Novel Use of Scanning Electron Microscopy for Detection of Iron‐Induced Morphological Changes in Human Blood

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1059-910X
eISSN
1097-0029
D.O.I.
10.1002/jemt.22163
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Fibrinogen is key to the maintenance of hemostasis and is an acute phase protein that is part of the coagulation cascade of proteins. It plays a fundamental role in inflammation, particularly as indicator for a proinflammatory state and is a prominent marker for developing vascular inflammatory diseases. The ultrastructure of fibrin nets can be studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with the addition of thrombin to plasma. In inflammatory conditions such as thromboembolic ischemic stroke and diabetes, the fibrin networks are changed to from dense matted fibrin deposits (DMDs) instead of typical netlike appearance. Similar DMDs can also be induced with the addition of FeCl2 and FeCl3. Importantly, the iron‐induced DMDs look similar to those from patients with prothrombotic conditions. Excessive or misplaced tissue iron now is recognized to pose a substantial health risk. The current research therefore investigates the establishment of a laboratory fibrinogen model to study that might mimic fibrin fiber generation that is achieved using plasma from healthy and diseased individuals. Furthermore, to determine whether the addition of iron to purified fibrinogen will show DMDs and whether hydrophilic agents can prevent them. We conclude that SEM is a very effective tool for the visualization of circulatory consequences of the interaction of iron‐induced hydroxyl radicals with human fibrinogen. Furthermore, this novel fibrinogen model provides a convenient method to study the interactions of the intramolecular and intermolecular hydrophobic forces responsible for the maintenance of the tertiary structure of native fibrin(ogen) and the prevention of iron‐induced DMDs formation by hydrophilic agents. Microsc. Res. Tech. 76:268–271, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Journal

Microscopy Research and TechniqueWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2013

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