NOTHOFAGUS AND PACIFIC BIOGEOGRAPHY

NOTHOFAGUS AND PACIFIC BIOGEOGRAPHY Abstract — Gondwanan biogeography, particularly the relationships between southern South America, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea and New Caledonia, has been much studied. Nothofagus is often used as the “test taxon”, and many papers have been directed at using Nothofagus to explain Gondwanan biogeography. Cladistic biogeographers, working on plant material, have generally failed to find congruence among taxa expected from the southern Pacific disjunctions. New morphological and molecular data on the phytogeny of Nothofagus have re‐opened the issue, and we analysed these data to construct a new hypothesis of the biogeography of the genus. We assembled all plant taxa for which we could find reasonably robust phylogenetic hypotheses, and sought a parsimonious biogeographical pattern common to all. Two analyses, based on different assumptions, produced the same general areacladogram. We use the general area‐cladogram, in conjunction with the fossil record of Nothofagus to construct a historical scenario for the evolution of the genus. This scenario indicates extensive extinction, but also suggests that Australia has a more recent relationship to New Zealand than to southern South America. This is not congruent with the current geological theories, nor with the patterns evident from insect biogeography. We suggest that concordant dispersal is an unlikely explanation for this pattern, and propose that the solution might be found in alternative geological hypotheses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cladistics Wiley

NOTHOFAGUS AND PACIFIC BIOGEOGRAPHY

Cladistics, Volume 11 (1) – Mar 1, 1995

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0748-3007
eISSN
1096-0031
DOI
10.1111/j.1096-0031.1995.tb00002.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract — Gondwanan biogeography, particularly the relationships between southern South America, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea and New Caledonia, has been much studied. Nothofagus is often used as the “test taxon”, and many papers have been directed at using Nothofagus to explain Gondwanan biogeography. Cladistic biogeographers, working on plant material, have generally failed to find congruence among taxa expected from the southern Pacific disjunctions. New morphological and molecular data on the phytogeny of Nothofagus have re‐opened the issue, and we analysed these data to construct a new hypothesis of the biogeography of the genus. We assembled all plant taxa for which we could find reasonably robust phylogenetic hypotheses, and sought a parsimonious biogeographical pattern common to all. Two analyses, based on different assumptions, produced the same general areacladogram. We use the general area‐cladogram, in conjunction with the fossil record of Nothofagus to construct a historical scenario for the evolution of the genus. This scenario indicates extensive extinction, but also suggests that Australia has a more recent relationship to New Zealand than to southern South America. This is not congruent with the current geological theories, nor with the patterns evident from insect biogeography. We suggest that concordant dispersal is an unlikely explanation for this pattern, and propose that the solution might be found in alternative geological hypotheses.

Journal

CladisticsWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1995

References

  • Combinable component consensus
    Bremer, Bremer
  • Choosing among multiple equally parsimonious cladograms
    Carpenter, Carpenter
  • Random cladistics
    Carpenter, Carpenter
  • A cladistic analysis of the genus Cyttaria (Fungi‐Ascomycotina
    Criscl, Criscl; Gamundi, Gamundi; Cabello, Cabello
  • Reply: towards a biogeography of the Caribbean
    Hedges, Hedges; Hass, Hass; Maxson, Maxson
  • Tertiary Nothofagus (Fagaceae) macrofossils from Tasmania and Antarctica and their bearing on the evolution of the genus
    Hill, Hill
  • Skewness and permutation
    Kallersjo, Kallersjo; Farris, Farris; Kluge, Kluge; Bull, Bull
  • Nothofagus (Fagaceae) and its invertebrate fauna‐an overview and preliminary synthesis
    McQuillan, McQuillan
  • Consensus cladograms and general classifications
    Miyamoto, Miyamoto
  • Comments on component‐compatability in historical biogeography
    Page, Page
  • Towards a cladistic biogeography of the Caribbean
    Page, Page; Lydeard, Lydeard
  • The cladistics of Amauris butterflies: congruence, consensus and total evidence
    Vane‐Wright, Vane‐Wright; Schulz, Schulz; Boppre, Boppre
  • Component compatibility in historical biogeography
    Zandee, Zandee; Roos, Roos

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